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Houser releases song snippets

Monday, August 9, 2010 – Randy Houser spent months in the studio recording his sophomore studio album, "They Call Me Cadillac," so when it came time to set a release date, Houser wanted to spread it out over a few months as well.

Houser and Show Dog-Universal Music will give fans a sneak peek starting this week. Snippets of Houser's record - beginning with Lowdown and Lonesome, They Call Me Cadillac and Addicted - will be made available on Aug. 10, upcoming single A Man Like Me and Will I Always Be This Way (available Aug. 17), and more. The songs will be at Houser's web site, RandyHouser.com, leading up to the release of "They Call Me Cadillac," which lands on shelves Sept. 21.

In addition to the weekly preview, Houser will share the origins of the tracks with the fans online with a first-hand look at the writing and recording process behind the 12-track self-penned album.

Sneak peek release dates are:

Aug. 10: Lowdown And Lonesome, They Call Me Cadillac and Addicted

Aug. 17: A Man Like Me and Will I Always Be This Way

Aug. 24: Out Here In The Country

Aug. 31: Here With Me

Sept. 7: Somewhere South of Memphis

Sept. 14: If I Could Buy Some Time and Lead Me Home

Best known for his hits Boots On and Anything Goes, Houser will be showcasing his catalog of crowd favorites and soon-to-be smashes on tour this fall with Gary Allan.

More news for Randy Houser

CD reviews for Randy Houser

How Country Feels CD review - How Country Feels
Despite a good track record of releasing quality music, Randy Houser hasn't become a consistent chart-topper yet. His new album, "How Country Feels," has already brought him one hit song with the title track, so perhaps a change of scenery (Houser is now on Stoney Creek) was what his career needed. Houser's last album, "They Call Me Cadillac," was a bluesy, varied album that unfortunately yielded no hits. This time around, he's gone for a much simpler »»»
They Call Me Cadillac CD review - They Call Me Cadillac
Country music needs more true country songs, not more songs proving country credentials. Randy Houser's latest contains a few examples of the former. After bragging unnecessarily in one verse about liking to "smoke from my left hand," he ends the chorus to Whistlin' Dixie by stating, "I ain't just Whistlin' Dixie." Then on the bluesy, rocking Out Here In The Country he tells us, "Them city lights ain't my cup of tea." But this bluster all »»»
Anything Goes CD review - Anything Goes
Randy Houser has been writing songs for other country artists for more than half a decade - he was best known for Trace Adkins' 2005 hitHonky Tonk Badonkadonk. And, as a kid, he spent summers with his musician father and played in his own bands. That history shows in the songs - a nice rhyme here, a catchy chorus there and Houser's expressive vocals throughout - and in the diversity of styles. He pushes all the right buttons for radio-ready singles. That makes for a handful of decent »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Church grows with time – It's heartening to see the continual rise of Eric Church's career, as he is one of the best songwriters in contemporary mainstream country music. Church mentioned from the stage how he performed for - in his estimation - only six loyal fans at The Whiskey for his first tour trip through Las Angeles a decade ago. His headlining stop last time... »»»
Concert Review: Brooks fires it up – Garth Brooks may have stood outside of country music by and large for 17 years, but he is jumping back in with both feet and more. Brooks released "Man Against Machine" in November, his first disc of original music in 13 years. Last fall, he launched a world tour, which is rolling out with multiple dates in multiple cities, sometimes... »»»
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