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Troy Olsen makes Opry debut

Wednesday, August 4, 2010 – Troy Olsen was invited to make his Grand Ole Opry debut on Tuesday, Aug. 17. The Grand Ole Opry, temporarily displaced from the Opry House, will be held at the War Memorial Auditorium in Nashville.

"Playing The Opry is a dream come true for me," said Olsen. "It's the mother church of country music, and I am humbled by the invitation. It's going to be a blast."

Olsen kicks off his "Get Right Tonight" club tour Friday night in Charleston, S.C. and will continue through November making stops in more than 40 cities across the country.

The Arizona native's debut single, Summer Thing, is currently climbing the country charts. His self-titled EP, which came out in May, is available at iTunes now.

Olsen was born a rancher's son in Arizona. He got his first guitar at age 12 and after high school began playing in roadhouse bands throughout the southwest, honing his live performance skills. Eventually he formed his own band, he has toured with his idol Dwight Yoakam, and even recorded an album with Yoakam's band after a chance meeting with Linda Ronstadt.

He moved to Nashville in 2003 trying to hone his skills as a songwriter and singer. His songs cuts by Blake Shelton (I'll Just Hold On) and Tim McGraw (Ghost Town Train).

More news for Troy Olsen

CD reviews for Troy Olsen

Troy Olsen EP CD review - Troy Olsen EP
Rather than a full album, Troy Olsen came out of the gate with an EP released as a digital download only. Summer Thing was the first of the tracks served up as a single. Though it's got enough Cervezas and pretty girls for a Kenny Chesney song, there's an edge of melancholy in both the lyrics and the delivery. An undercurrent of harder times and problems best forgotten adds an air of realism to what might otherwise be just another party song. It also delivers a strong sense of place, »»»
Living In Your World
One look at the way he wears his hat over his eyes, and you'll know who is Troy Olsen's biggest influence. And one song on this album ("Who Gave You The Right") does copy Dwight Yoakam's sound too closely. But that track is an aberration. For the most part, Olsen uses Yoakam the way young Dwight used Buck Owens - as a jumping off point to turn something old into something new. The Arizona native recorded his debut in Southern California with many veterans of that area's country music scene - »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Womack planned a good night – Lee Ann Womack pretty much summed up where she's at these days in concluding her show with Don Williams "Lord I Hope This Day Is Good." The ever-strong voiced country traditionalist sang, "I don't need fortune and I don't need fame" with the concluding line of the stanza asking the Man upstairs to "plan a good day for me.... »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
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