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Country Music Hall honors Wynette

Friday, July 23, 2010 – The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum will honor Tammy Wynette, in Tammy Wynette: First Lady of Country Music, Presented by Great American Country Television Network, a biographical exhibit opening Friday, Aug. 20, for a 10-month run in the Museum's East Gallery. The exhibit will run through June 12, 2011.

Opening weekend festivities will include an exhibit introduction and talk by a museum curator; a panel discussion featuring friends and associates of Wynette and illustrated with photos, film footage and recordings from the Museum's Frist Library and Archive; and a screening of the 1987 documentary "Stand by Your Dream."

"Tammy Wynette was a true steel magnolia, a daughter of the South whose ladylike appearance and slight physical stature belied the magnitude of her grit, determination and talent," said Museum Director Kyle Young. "Throughout her career, her personal and professional lives were indistinguishably interwoven, resulting in achingly honest recordings and performances to which fans could relate. She helped redefine what it means to be a female country singer. Her death at age 55 came far too soon, but Tammy left behind a musical canon that is among the strongest and most influential in American music history.

"Accordingly, we are thrilled to have Faith Hill play a prominent role in our exhibit," Young continued. " Hill sat down with curators for an on-camera interview and talked at length about Wynette's influence. The resulting video, which is woven throughout the exhibit's narrative, provides an artist's unique context and insight.

Artifacts featured in the exhibit include the following:

Several of Wynette's childhood possessions, including a petite hand-painted wooden chair with rush seat; and an ecru embroidered cotton and lace baby bonnet

Recipe box and numerous recipes in Wynette's own hand, including directions for fried green tomatoes and ice box lemon pie, which Tammy noted as "my children's favorite"

A lead-crystal vase filled with cotton hand-picked by Wynette, which was long a fixture on the singer's coffee table

A black, leather-bound appointment book for 1977, given to Wynette by Billy Sherrill, which details her activities during the year. The journal-like entries note both career events and personal, sometimes humorous anecdotes, e.g. "August 10, 1977 - Maxine & Cliff went to Gov. mansion with us. Gov. Blanton took me to kitchen and made me drink 8 oz. glass of cabbage juice."

A peek into Wynette's glam closet will feature an array of elaborate beaded gowns, many created by Wynette's long-time designer, Jeff Billings, as well as casual and dressy designer separates, including a teal and russet brocade jacket designed by Oscar de la Renta, embellished with faux leopard fur, embroidery and bold enamel buttons.

Numerous awards, including Wynette's 1968-70 Country Music Association awards for Female Vocalist of the Year; her 1967 and 1969 Best Female Country Vocal Performance Grammy awards (for "I Don't Wanna Play House" and "Stand by Your Man," respectively); and her 2000 Academy of Country Music Pioneer Award.

More news for Tammy Wynette

CD reviews for Tammy Wynette

Take Me to Your World/I Don't Wanna Play House
"Take Me to Your World/I Don't Wanna Play House," originally released 30 years ago and rather awkwardly named after its two biggest hits, was Tammy Wynette's second album. If not quite on a par with her achievements in her subsequent two releases "D-I-V-O-R-C-E" and "Stand By Your Man," this is no slouch for all that. "Jackson Ain't a Very Big Town," "Broadminded" and the two title tracks all show producer Billy Sherrill already finding appropriate vehicles for the lyrical subjects and the vocals »»»
Stand By Your Man
No one had a bigger voice or a more tragic catch to their voice than Tammy Wynette - and in that open-throated heartbreak, the collective psyches and traumas of the post-feminist non-feminist woman rose and fell. "Stand By Your Man," from a sociologist's perspective, is certainly the song and, in turn, the album that galvanized Wynette's place as the anti-Steinem; a fact that's both important and misleading. Wynette was never about subservience or being done wrong. She was about compassion and »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile brings thoughtfulness – Brandi Carlile returned to the GRAMMY Museum for the third time, and it's easy to see why she's always invited back. The evening began with GRAMMY Executive Scott Goldman interviewing Carlile on a pair of stuffed chairs, which was followed directly by a brief set of live songs. The interview portion was informative, while Carlile's... »»»
Concert Review: LSD tour provides a lot of highs – This was not your grandkids' country, that's for sure. Even the name of the tour - the LSD Tour - was a throwback (albeit far before the principals were making music). But make no mistake about it. With the ever cool country traditionalist Dwight Yoakam, the country with some rock and blues and rabble rousing of Steve Earle thrown in and the... »»»
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