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Steve Earle receives Emmy nomination, tours with Electric Hot Tuna

Thursday, July 8, 2010 – Steve Earle received an Emmy Award Nomination for his song, This City in the Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics Category today. The new song closed the season finale of HBO's series Treme.

Produced by T Bone Burnett and featuring arrangements by Allen Toussaint, This City was written specifically for the series. From David Simon (creator of The Wire) and Eric Overmyer (writer/producer of Law & Order), Treme begins in the fall of 2005, three months after Hurricane Katrina's devastation on the city of New Orleans. The series title refers to one of New Orleans' oldest neighborhoods and a historically important source of music and culture.

The 62nd Primetime Emmy Awards telecast, which will be hosted by Jimmy Fallon, will air on Aug. 29 on NBC. This is Earle's first Emmy Award Nomination.

Earle played a recurring character, Harley, a street musician, in three episodes of Treme. When speaking about the brand new song, he said, "David Simon came on the set one day and asked me to write a song that my character would have written in '05. The next morning I woke up and wrote it."

Earle has also announced summer tour dates with Electric Hot Tuna in addition to multiple nights, which begin this evening, in his adoptive hometown of New York City at the City Winery. Each night will feature his wife, singer songwriter Allison Moorer and special guests. Among those announced are Roseanne Cash, The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Greg Trooper, and Steve Earle's son, Justin Townes Earle.

Tour dates are:
July 8 - New York, NY City Winery (Earle, Allison Moorer and Roseanne Cash)
July 15 - New York, NY City Winery (Earle, Allison Moorer and Justin Earle)
July 17 - Westbury, NY North Fork Theatre w/ Electric Hot Tuna
July 18 - Asbury Park, NJ Stone Pony Summerstage w/ Electric Hot Tuna
July 20 - Baltimore, MD Rams Head Live w/ Electric Hot Tuna
July 21st - York, PA The Strand Capital Performing Arts Center w/ Electric Hot Tuna
July 23rd - New Haven, CT Shubert Performing Arts Center w/ Electric Hot Tuna
July 24 - Purchase, NY SUNY Purchase Performing Arts Center w/ Electric Hot Tuna
July 25 - Portsmouth, NH New Hampshire Prescott Art Festival
July 28 - Rochester, NY Water Street Music Hall w/ Electric Hot Tuna
July 29 - New York, NY The City Winery (Earle, Allison Moorer and Preservation Hall Jazz Band)
July 30 - Albany, NY The Egg with Electric Hot Tuna
July 31st - Boston, MA House of Blues with Electric Hot Tuna
Aug. 5 - New York, NY The City Winery (Earle, Allison Moorer, Greg Trooper)
Aug. 7 - Oneonta, NY Oneonta Theatre
Aug. 15 - Los Angeles, CA The Greek Theatre w/ Levon Helm
Sept. 4 - Stradbally, Ireland Electric Picnic Festival
Sept. 5 - Cambridge, UK Cambridge Corn Exchange
Sept. 7 - Cardiff, UK Saint David's Hall
Sept. 8 - Dunfermline, UK Alhambra Theatre
Sept. 9 - Shetland Islands, Clickmin Leisure Centre

More news for Steve Earle

CD reviews for Steve Earle

So You Wanna Be An Outlaw CD review - So You Wanna Be An Outlaw
If Steve Earle had never done another album after "Guitar Town" and "Copperhead Road," he'd still have cemented his place in the musical firmament for skillfully creating a ragged and beautiful tapestry from the stray threads of rootsy rock and authentic country. And that may well be why his catalog over the past three decades has been so compelling and satisfying; he has consistently proven that he has nothing to prove. "So You Wannabe an Outlaw" is the latest »»»
Terraplane CD review - Terraplane
In the Instagram era where people use apps to turn digital snapshots into sepia-toned portraits, Steve Earle's 16th studio release finds its place with an old-school sound. It's a Polaroid of rural country, blues and bluegrass frozen in time. But instead of outdated, it plays on the nostalgia of its modern audience. Named for the 1930s Hudson muscle car model, "Terraplane," the cover is a cacophony of vintage graphics hinting to the fun times that lie beneath. »»»
The Warner Bros Years CD review - The Warner Bros Years
On the surface, this five-disc box set appears to be another egregious exercise in major label money-grubbing, a study on how to squeeze every last penny out of those precious (and paid-for) catalogs. After all, what self-respecting fan of Steve Earle doesn't own "Train A' Comin'," "I Feel Alright" and "El Corazon" in at least four or five formats (including the hard-to-find mini-disc version)? That said, it's kind of cool to have all three »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lots to like about McKenna (when you could hear her) – Lori McKenna had lots of reasons to be in a good mood. First off, the opening band, a pop act called teenender included two of her sons. In two days, her 11th disc, "The Tree" would be released to glowing reviews. So it would seem that this homecoming show was the ideal setting with all five kids, her husband, siblings, cousins, people who... »»»
Concert Review: With Sugarland, the wait was worth it – A few songs into Sugarland's show, Kristian Bush referenced the band's five-year gap between tours saying, "A lot of people think Jennifer and I have been on a five-year vacation. Actually, we've been very busy." Clearly a lot of that time was spent in rehearsal. The duo put on a two-hour high energy gem that started out big... »»»
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