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Chesney names Boys of Fall new single

Thursday, July 8, 2010 – Kenny Chesney debuts Boys of Fall as the first single from his upcoming "Hemingway's Whiskey" at radio on July 12.

When the ballad by Casey Beathard and Dave Turnbull landed in a stack of tapes Chesney was listening to for his next record, he liked what he heard.

"I just stopped right there, and played it over and over again," Chesney says of the song. "I knew - as maybe only someone who has felt that thrill of rushing out onto the field on a cold Friday night can - that was exactly how it is...and it also gives you a sense of why playing football in high school is such a powerful thing for anyone who does it. It's life changing; it just is - and for anyone who's never experienced that, this song helps them understand why."

The video for the lead track from his Sept. 28 CD release features New Orleans Saints coach Sean Payton delivering a heartfelt speech to the team where the 2010 Super Bowl-winning coach spent his own high school football career,

Chesney is co-producing a documentary featuring many of football's greatest players and coaches addressing the power of the game in shaping their sense of discipline, humanity and dreams.

"The thing about all of it - the song, the video, the documentary, it's not just about people who play football and go onto be Joe Namath or (ESPN's) Kirk Herbstreit, it's about the Moms driving their kids to practice, and the way this'll shape the men their sons will become...the girls who come to the games and cheer - and are part of why the boys want to achieve... It's about the towns who identify with the fate of their team so heavily, it's a topic of conversation at the diner or the barber shop... and the players who won't play past high school, but use the lessons they learn to become successful as their lives evolve."

"Anyone who thinks high school football is just a game hasn't really experienced the best part of high school football. For the coaches, it's the chance to shape lives; for the kids, it's the rush and the glory; for the people watching, it's the thrill of seeing their young men achieve. It brings all kinds of communities together in ways people don't often think about - but anyone who's heard this song, they nod their head and smile, because they know."

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Welcome to the Fishbowl CD review - Welcome to the Fishbowl
Kenny Chesney is synonymous with all things summer and good times. "Welcome to the Fishbowl" is a radical departure. If you're going to drink a beer and listen to this album, you may need a Prozac chaser. It is a bit short on fun as Chesney deals with terminal illnesses, loss of privacy and lost love. It leads off with the catchy Come Over, which is in the same vein as Lady A's Need You Now. On Sing 'Em My Good Friend, a man selling an old guitar full of memories »»»
Hemingway's Whiskey CD review - Hemingway's Whiskey
There are two warring sides to Kenny Chesney's musical personality. There's the part of him that wants to record throwaway, beach bum anthems like Coastal. However, the singer's better half excels at ballads like Where I Grew Up. The latter song contrasts youthful foolish behaviors with events that add quality real world experiences to a life. Drinking beer with high school buddies may have made him feel like a man, but it was a drunk-driving accident that grew him up - but fast. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: No joke, The Wacos return – The Clash may have ended their run decades ago, but one couldn't blame Joe Strummer - if able to listen from the grave - that his band is alive and well. Only now he'd have to think they were reincarnated as The Waco Brothers. And Strummer needn't worry about whether the long running Chicago band is up to snuff either.... »»»
Concert Review: Jewel survives life's ups and downs – Jewel did not give a straightforward, traditional concert. If you were looking for the lovely voiced singer to hop on stage with acoustic guitar in hand and play career-spanning songs, that wasn't going to happen. But what the sold-out crowd did receive was a most open window into the life of a singer who has experienced life's ups and... »»»
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