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Nashville telethon raises $1.5M for flood relief

Monday, May 17, 2010 – Brad Paisley, Keith Urban and Lady Antebellum joined other entertainment stars Sunday to perform and answer phones to help raise more than $1.5 million for flood relief for Tennessee.

"If there is a silver lining, it's that the world is getting to see Nashville at its best through this tragedy," Paisley said during the telethon broadcaaston the GAC Network.

The singer started the event off with Welcome To The Future. Paisley's wife, actress Kimberly Williams Paisley, was the show's co-host. "My wife's up there. I think it's time to start things off with a donation. We're going to donate $100,000, get it going," he said, before asking his wife with a grin, "Is that okay?"

Paisley also offered River and Rain and American Saturday Night" with Dierks Bentley on acoustic guitar.

Sheryl Crow performed a new song, labeling herself a newcomer in Nashville since moving here five years ago. "I've lived a lot of different places, but I've never felt home until I lived here," she said.

Kellie Pickler, wearing an I heart Nashville flood relief T-shirt, sang her new single, Making Me Fall In Love Again. "I couldn't be more proud to now be a citizen of Nashville. I love it here," she said.

Lady Antebellum performed an acoustic version of their number one hit Need You Now and later played I Run To You. "Being a Nashville native, born and raised here, it's been so beautiful to see how the city has rallied together," singer Hillary Scott said. "I know we will get back to the city that we once were. I know we will."

Urban chose to do an acoustic version of the Beatles' song Help, with his wife, Nicole Kidman watching from the side of the stage. Before performing a second song, Better Life,/I> Urban told about his personal flood experience.

"We certainly weren't spared. Our place out in Franklin, we had quite a bit of damage out there. And other than a lot of my musical equipment - which floated down the river toward Smyrna, I think is where it was seen last - it's just been a very moving experience for me," he said.

Other performers included Martina McBride, Rodney Atkins, new artist Randy Montana, gospel singer CeCe Winans, blues singer Keb' Mo', and Christian artist Jaci Velasquez.

Singer Will Hoge ended the show with Washed By The Water. By the end of the song, all were on their feet, singing the chorus, "Down here we're washed by the water, the water can't wash us away."

The event aired live and commercial free from Nashville's Ryman Auditorium on GAC.

All money will go to the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. At least 2,000 homes were destroyed or damaged in Nashville by the deadly flooding that struck Tennessee May 1-2. Damages have been estimated at least totaling $1.5 billion.

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