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Young, Lady A lead Billboard charts

Thursday, May 13, 2010 – Chris Young is atop the Billboard Country Songs chart for the week ending May 22 with The Man I Want to Be with Lady Antebellum number 1 on the album chart with "Need You Now."

The Court Yard Hounds, the duo featuring Dixie Chicks Emily Robison and Martie Maguire, debuted in the top 10 overall, but did not chart on the country album chart.

Young assumed the top spot from Joe Nichols' Gimmie That Girl. Kenny Chesney remained third with Ain't Back Yet, as did Lady Antebellum at four with American Honey. Miranda Lambert was up two to fifth with The House That Built Me."

Eric Church broke into the top 10 - at 10 - with Hell on the Heart. Jerrod Niemann made it into the top 20 - at 19 - with Lover, Lover.

Carrie Underwood had the biggest mover with Undo It jumping from 29 to 23. Gary Allan made it to 30, up 1 with Get Off on the Pain. There was very little chart movement otherwise with many songs up one spot.

On the album chart, Zac Brown Band debuted in second with "Pass the Jar: Live from the Fabulous Fox Theatre In Atlanta." ZBB also was third with "The Foundation." Lambert was fourth with "Revolution, while Underwood was fifth with "Play On." Lady A's self-titled debut was up four to seven. Alan Jackson moved up three places to ninth with "Freight Train."

Josh Turner was up 3 to 16 with Haywire." Reba McEntire jumped 7 to 17 with "Keep on Loving You." Tim McGraw's "Southern Voice" was up 6 to 22. Danny Gokey's "My Best Days" stood at 24, up 3. Rascal Flatts also was up 3, to 27, with "Unstoppable."

Chely Wright debuted at 32 with "Lifted Off the Ground." Toby Keith's "American Ride" was up 3 to 33. George Twang moved up 3 to 37 with "Twang."

On the Billboard 200 overall chart, Lady A was second, the Courtyard Hounds 7th, Zac Brown 17 and 21, Lambert 23 and Underwood 30.

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CD reviews for Chris Young

It Must Be Christmas CD review - It Must Be Christmas
Song selection can sometimes seem fairly inessential whenever chosen by a master singer. Such is the case with "It Must Be Christmas," Chris Young's new holiday collection. He sounds as perfectly comfortable with the jazzy "I'll Be Home for Christmas," where its supper club vibe takes a little of the edge off one seriously sad song, as he does with the Phil Spector rock nugget "Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)." Young is also helped out by a few special guests. »»»
I'm Comin' Over CD review - I'm Comin' Over
Chris Young has enjoyed steady success from his previous four releases, and there's no reason to suggest that "I'm Comin' Over" won't do the same. But that doesn't mean that Young is doing anything all that different from what's au courant. Young's go to has always been his full-sounding, big-bodied voice, and that remains intact here throughout these 11 songs, 9 of which he had a hand in writing. His voice is front and center (that's apparent »»»
A.M. CD review - A.M.
The refrain from the title track from Chris Young goes "We're wide awake in the A.M." Based on the sounds emanating from Young on his fourth CD, he'd be awake at any hour if they listened to this music. Young came up through the ranks as what could be described as on the traditional side. Drinkin' Me Lonely from 2006 was evidence of that. But since country music is a moving target, Young's brand has modern flourishes. Lots. Unfortunately, it seems that Young - fine »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: In crazy times, a little Williams joy endures – Nearly a week before the inauguration President-elect Donald Trump, Lucinda Williams served notice she's set on counting her blessings (opening her concert with "Blessed"), and determined not to let her joy be stolen by troubled times (closing with "Joy"). With a nearly two-hour set, Williams drew from all points her recording... »»»
Concert Review: Things change for McKenna, but not everything – The more things change - and in the case of Lori McKenna, that's a really good thing - the more they remain the same. Not only is that also a really good thing for McKenna, but also her fans. This was the annual rite of December for McKenna in coming to her home area of Massachusetts and playing a run of shows at the venerable club where she has... »»»
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