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Hank Williams receives Pulitzer Prize

Monday, April 12, 2010 – More than half a century after his death, Hank Williams won a Pulitzer Prize.

Williams received the Special Citation honor Monday for his lifetime achievement as a musician when the Pulitzers for 2010 were announced by Columbia University.

The citation praises Williams for "his craftsmanship as a songwriter who expressed universal feelings with poignant simplicity and played a pivotal role in transforming country music into a major musical and cultural force in American life."

The Board, chaired by Anders Gyllenhaal, executive editor of the Miami Herald, made the award after a confidential survey of experts in popular music. "The citation, above all, recognizes the lasting impact of Williams as a creative force that influenced a wide range of other musicians and performers," said Sig Gissler, administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes. "At the same time, the award highlights the Board's desire to broaden its Music Prize and recognize the full range of musical excellence that might not have been considered in the past."

In recent years, the board awarded several other Special Citations in music: jazz composers Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane in 2006 and 2007 and to composer and singer Bob Dylan in 2008.

Williams, who died in 1953 at age 29, was noted for writing and singing songs that reflected the hopes and struggles of everyday Americans, and his compositional skill and fusion of genres, experts say, became the measure by which country music is judged. Among his most famous songs are the standards Your Cheatin' Heart, Cold Cold Heart, I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry and Jambalaya.

More news for Hank Williams

CD reviews for Hank Williams

The Garden Spot Program 1950 CD review - The Garden Spot Program 1950
In a career that spanned a mere six years - a minuscule amount of time compared to those who are today celebrating anniversaries of 40, 50 or even 60 years of more - Hank Williams established himself as an abiding influence on all those who followed, a man whose music is as relevant and revered today as it was when it was originally recorded. Indeed, what Williams accomplished in that scant amount of time still resonates nearly 70 years later. There's been an abundance of compilations, »»»
The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams CD review - The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams
"The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams" is a great story before you even start playing the music. Williams, according to the story, used to write down his lyric ideas in notebooks. When he died, there were four notebooks of unreleased or unperformed songs. Over the years, the notebooks remained in the possession of Williams' publishers Acuff-Rose and few knew of them. One who did, however, was longtime Nashville executive Mary Martin, who shepherded this project to its eventual light-of-day. »»»
Revealed The Unreleased Recordings CD review - Revealed The Unreleased Recordings
After his death in 1953, Hank Williams, became less a performer than a post-mortem brand name wherein his basic personality as an artist was increasingly downplayed and diminished. This remarkably enjoyable three-CD set, drawn from warmly remastered acetates - featuring occasional surface noise - of the old Mother's Best radio show, showcases much of that nearly lost essence. Supported by his regular collaborators the Drifting Cowboys, Williams brings surprising drive to live renditions his »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Dixie Chicks age maybe even a little better – Natalie Maines, lead singer of the Dixie Chicks, joked that when she recorded Fleetwood Mac's "Landslide" 15 years ago, the line "and I'm getting older too," didn't mean as much as it does today. However, this group, which also includes Emily Robison on (mostly) banjo and Martie Maguire on fiddle, began as a bluegrass... »»»
Concert Review: Hensley, Ickes have a good thing going – Chances are strong that Dobro master extraordinaire Rob Ickes has used the line a time or two when he explained his instrument of choice as "a guitar played incorrectly." The line got the requisite laughter from the small crowd of about 25 in the intimate club. His sidekick, Trey Hensley, didn't offer any such comment.... »»»
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