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Moorer, Earle welcome son

Thursday, April 8, 2010 – Allison Moorer and Steve Earle had their first child, John Henry Earle, earlier this week. John Henry was born on April 5 at 10:07 a.m., weighing eight pounds, two ounces and measuring 21 inches long.

Moorer and Earle were married in 2005 and live in New York's Greenwich Village.

Earle's other children include Justin Townes Earle.

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CD reviews

Terraplane CD review - Terraplane
In the Instagram era where people use apps to turn digital snapshots into sepia-toned portraits, Steve Earle's 16th studio release finds its place with an old-school sound. It's a Polaroid of rural country, blues and bluegrass frozen in time. But instead of outdated, it plays on the nostalgia of its modern audience. Named for the 1930s Hudson muscle car model, "Terraplane," the cover is a cacophony of vintage graphics hinting to the fun times that lie beneath. »»»
The Warner Bros Years CD review - The Warner Bros Years
On the surface, this five-disc box set appears to be another egregious exercise in major label money-grubbing, a study on how to squeeze every last penny out of those precious (and paid-for) catalogs. After all, what self-respecting fan of Steve Earle doesn't own "Train A' Comin'," "I Feel Alright" and "El Corazon" in at least four or five formats (including the hard-to-find mini-disc version)? That said, it's kind of cool to have all three »»»
The Low Highway CD review - The Low Highway
If you're a forever smitten fan of Steve Earle who's always looking forward to his next record, you'll likely be satisfied with "The Low Highway." It's a 12-song collection of strong songs, all stamped with his signature sound. The title cut is a beautiful, world-weary ballad that narrates a trip along the highways and byways of America. Over a gently rocking beat, Earle crosses paths with empty houses, hungry people and broken factories, a bleak picture that belies »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: For The Wailin' Jennys, the road provides antidote – Six shows in six nights for The Wailin' Jennys practically counts for a full-blown tour these days. In fact, this - the final stop - was the longest tour by the mainly Canadian trio playing folk and country since 2011 when the band released its last recording, "Bright Morning Stars." A few dates here and there, but no new recording.... »»»
Concert Review: Church is in session – Eric Church's choir is growing pretty large these days. Taking a perhaps risky approach with his latest CD, the edgy rocking with purpose "The Outsiders," along with the even riskier decision to play large-scale arenas, Church showed that the risks were worth it in a record setting show. Church not only had to have faith in himself -... »»»
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Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

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Suffer in Peace CD review - Suffer in Peace

Sometimes, you have to start at the top before you can get real. Tyler Farr's 2013 debut, "Redneck Crazy," spawned two hits and landed in the Top Five. Colt Ford had him take ""Dirt Road Anthem" for a spin before Jason Aldean cut it. His sophomore effort, "Suffer in Silence," is more introspective. »»»

Jekyll + Hyde CD review - Jekyll + Hyde
Fans looking for the Zac Brown Band of 2005 won't find it in "Jekyll + Hyde" - there's nothing but an aftertaste of the Georgia group's chicken-fried origins. That might be why the album's name is so appropriate. Fans have gotten to know the country-folk band, but a deviant creeps in on all 16 tracks of its fourth album. And, like the classic story, Hyde stands out as more interesting. »»»