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Jackson's "Freight Train" tour gets ready to leave the station

Monday, February 22, 2010 – Alan Jackson's Freight Train Tour will kick off in early April. The tour is being launched about one week after his new CD , "Freight Train," is released.

The tour start April 8 in Estero, Fla. and ends May 23 in Lexington, Ky. , hitting 15 cities. Josh Turner and Chris Young will open the shows.

"Freight Train," out March 30, includes eight Jackson original songs plus four more, including It's Just That Way, the first single, and a duet with Lee Ann Womack on the Vern Gosdin classic, Till the End.

Jackson said the title track "sounded different and just kind of stuck out. I guess when you really think about it, man, we've been rolling along here for a lot of years, just going like a freight train."

Jackson will launch the album with March 30th appearances on Today and the Late Show with David Letterman, an April 4th appearance on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and an April 5th appearance on Ellen, his first on that show.

Tour dates are:

April 8 - Estero, FL/ Germain Arena


April 9 - Orlando, FL/ UCF Arena


April 10 - Alpharetta, GA/ Verizon Wireless Amphitheater at Encore Park


April 11 - Greenville, SC/ Bi-Lo Center



April 29 - Champaign, IL/ Assembly Hall (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)


April 30 - Moline, IL/ iWireless Center


May 1 - Rosemont, IL/ AllState Arena


May 2 - Fort Wayne, IN/ War Memorial Coliseum



May 13 - Manchester, NH/ Verizon Wireless Arena


May 14 - Uncasville, CT/ Mohegan Sun Arena


May 15 - Rochester, NY/ Blue Cross Arena


May 16 - Wilkes-Barre, PA/ Wachovia Center



May 21 - University Park, PA/ Bryce Jordan Center


May 22 - Charleston, WV/ Charleston Civic Center 


May 23 - Lexington, KY/ Rupp Arena

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