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Justin Townes Earle puts out '09's best CD

Monday, December 14, 2009 – Justin Townes Earle put out the best album of 2009, "Midnight at the Movies," according to a panel of Americana, country and other like-minded bloggers.

The list includes 20 discs, ranging from Dave Rawlings Machine to Charlie Robison to Steve Earle to Miranda Lambert.

The top 20 as voted by the panel was:

1 Justin Townes Earle - Midnight at the Movies

2 Lucero - 1372 Overton Park

3 Ryan Bingham & the Dead Horses - Roadhouse Sun

4 Buddy and Julie Miller - Written in Chalk

5 Dave Rawlings Machine - A Friend of a Friend

6 Slaid Cleaves - Everything You Love Will Be Taken Away

7 Todd Snider - The Excitement Plan

8 Avett Brothers - I and Love and You

9 Band of Heathens - One Foot In the Ether

9 Jason Isbell & 400 Unit - Self Titled

10 Tom Russell - Blood & Candlesmoke

11 Jason Isbell & 400 Unit - Self Titled

12 Corb Lund - Losin' Lately Gambler

13 Charlie Robison - Beautiful Day

14 Drive-By Truckers - The Fine Print

15 Steve Earle - Townes

16 Deer Tick - Born on Flag Day

17 Wrinkle Neck Mules - Let The Lead Fly

18 Magnolia Electric Co. - Josephine

19 Guy Clark - Somedays The Songs Write You

20 Those Darlins - Those Darlins

20 Miranda Lambert - Revolution

Voters included representatives of Country California, Americana Roots, Twangville, Sounds Country and Too Much Country.

More news for Justin Townes Earle

CD reviews for Justin Townes Earle

Kids in the Street CD review - Kids in the Street
With "Kids In The Street," Justin Townes Earle moves comfortably between country, blues, folk and rock. The strongest country tunes are the traditional sounding weeper "What's She Crying For," featuring slick pedal steel guitar work from Paul Niehaus, and the catchy ballad "Faded Valentine," a sweetly melancholic tale of lost love that highlights producer Mike Mogis on mandolin. The nostalgic title track finds Earle reminiscing about his unspectacular childhood »»»
Absent Fathers CD review - Absent Fathers
Fans of the early Justin Townes Earle might be disappointed in the work that fills "Absent Fathers," his 2015 album that shows the once reckless outlaw-wannabe has grown up past the anger and found a home in therapeutic songwriting. For the rest of listeners, however, it's a cathartic and thought-provoking journey through his atonement, not with his muddy past, but instead with his own pain. Earle's voice hints of the same grittiness found in Black Keys front man Dan »»»
Single Mothers CD review - Single Mothers
We've all heard Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Freebird" more times than we can count and have likely played air guitar to it many of those times too. And the lifestyle it celebrates is one few Americans experience throughout their lives. You know, being able to love 'em and leave 'em while going on to the next town. Justin Townes Earle's "Single Mothers" presents - at least in part - the consequences of adults trying to live that lifestyle. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile brings thoughtfulness – Brandi Carlile returned to the GRAMMY Museum for the third time, and it's easy to see why she's always invited back. The evening began with GRAMMY Executive Scott Goldman interviewing Carlile on a pair of stuffed chairs, which was followed directly by a brief set of live songs. The interview portion was informative, while Carlile's... »»»
Concert Review: LSD tour provides a lot of highs – This was not your grandkids' country, that's for sure. Even the name of the tour - the LSD Tour - was a throwback (albeit far before the principals were making music). But make no mistake about it. With the ever cool country traditionalist Dwight Yoakam, the country with some rock and blues and rabble rousing of Steve Earle thrown in and the... »»»
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