Sign up for newsletter
 

Pam Tillis returns in April with new CD

Tuesday, January 30, 2007 – About five years after a tribute disc to her father, Pam Tillis will be back in April with a new album, "Rhinestoned."

Co-produced by the trio of Tillis, Matt Spicher (Marty Stuart, Ricky Skaggs) and Gary Nicholson (Delbert McClinton, Wynnona), the new CD is her first independent release, due April 17 on her own Stellar Cat label, marketed and distributed by Thirty Tigers and RED Distribution.

With "It's All Relative," her tribute to her father Mel Tillis, Tillis combed through her father's catalog. "That was the first record I ever made where I wasn't concerned about having to come up with three singles," she said.

Tillis indicated the new album on her own label gave her a lot of artistic freedom "This is an A&R-free zone," she said. "It's a bookend to the Dad album, except it has all new songs. It's like a bridge between the present and the past."

"If you look at my record collection circa 1974," Tillis said, "you'd see Emmylou, Graham Parsons, Waylon Jennings, Don Williams, Linda Ronstadt, and Neil Young. Flying Burrito Brothers - hippie country I call it - that was some of the best music that ever came out of this town. Maybe it wasn't happening on country radio at the time, but it sold record and built careers. It was the vibrant scene on the fringes of country, which was very cool - just as it is today."

The "Rhinestoned" sessions started in 2004. Beginning with around 20 songs, Tillis and Spicher whittled the number down to 10, which they cut and set aside. A few months later, they repeated the process. And then, after reflecting for a while on what she had accomplished, Tillis decided something wasn't right. She talked about it with her trusted friend and writing partner Gary Nicholson and reached a critical decision.

"It needed to be more country," she said. "I played what we had for Gary, brought him into the picture, and suddenly it felt like we weren't wandering in the woods anymore. When I found the song 'Band in the Window,' suddenly I could see and hear the whole project in my mind right down to the t-shirts," Tillis said.

Since she began her country music career, Pam Tillis racked up 6 number 1 singles and 14 top 10 hits, racking up sales of over 5 million. In 1994, Tillis was crowned CMA's female vocalist of the year. Other milestones have included two Grammy awards and a slew of ACM and Grammy nominations. She self produced her "All of this Love" album which yielded 2 Top 5 hits. As an actress, she starred in Leiber and Stoller's "Smokey Joe's Café" on Broadway as well as "Promise Land" and "LA Law." Tillis was inducted into the Grand Ole Opry in 2000.

More news for Pam Tillis

CD reviews for Pam Tillis

Just in Time for Christmas CD review - Just in Time for Christmas
Pam Tillis takes a supper club approach to Christmas music. It may be the holiday season, but Tillis has put male/female relationships prominently under her tree, right along with all her other presents. Songs like "Christmas Waltz," "What Are You Doing New Year's Eve?" and "I'll Be Home For Christmas" all point out the social nature of this popular season. Many arrangements sound the way a piano man might sing them at his piano bar. »»»
Rhinestoned CD review - Rhinestoned
Pam Tillis' first non-major label disc, "Tillis Sings Tillis," reminded listeners that Mel's daughter had strong roots in his brand of traditional country. She takes advantage of her continued independence on this new release on her own label to venture not just into traditional fare, but pop, rock and even bit of cabaret jazz style. The end result is a widely varied and enjoyable album that's still commercial-sounding enough that one could imagine many of these songs on »»»
It's All Relative - Tillis Sings Tillis
Lucky Dog reverses their usual equation (matching outsider acts with mainstream producers) by combining a proven Nashville hitmaker with rootsy producer, Ray Benson (Asleep at the Wheel). Their meeting ground is the rich, decade-spanning songbook of the singer's father, Mel Tillis, with results that perfectly amplify the combination of songwriter and singer. Pam Tillis has written, recorded and produced her share of hits, but none with the emotional charge of tackling her father's songbook. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
Concert Review: Wolf rolls on with ease – Peter Wolf starts off his first disc in six years, "A Cure for Loneliness," with "Rolling On." Great title for a song, and as he would prove in concert, he lived up to those words. The song starts "You can lay down and die / You can lay up and count the tears you've cried / But baby, that's not me / There's a... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Reams leaps into "Rhyme & Season" James Reams is one of bluegrass music's unconventional stalwarts. A son of Kentucky, Reams' journey has taken any number of unusual pathways since the mid-seventies. Producing albums for more than 20 years, Reams' ninth release of personable bluegrass, "Rhyme and Season," is a relaunch for Reams, an artist who has never followed a singular route. ... »»»
Solivan  turns to family, friends, heroes After scoring a 2015 IBMA nomination for Best Bluegrass Album for "Cold Spell," Frank Solivan tried something a little different this time around - an album of songs recorded by "Family, Friends and Heroes" (Compass). In an earlier musical life, Solivan served as stalwart in Country Current, the Navy's touring bluegrass band. Solivan left the service and formed Dirty Kitchen, a hat-tip to his background and continuing efforts as a chef.... »»»
Sellers garages her country Aubrie Sellers just may be onto something on her debut - garage country. After all, we've already witnessed traditional country, new country, neo-traditional, country rock, pop country and bro country. Sellers, a 25-year-old Nashvillian with a big time musical pedigree who released her debut, "New City Blues," in January, said the moniker came to mind as her bio was being written.... »»»
Couchville Sessions CD review - Couchville Sessions
For those who remain unaware of Darrell Scott, "The Couchville Sessions" is an ideal starting place. Long one of "rock, folk, country (and) blues" (to misquote the lead track, "Down to the River") most esteemed sidemen (Robert Plant's Band of Joy, Guy Clark, Steve Earle), collaborators (Tim O'Brien) and songwriters ("Long Time Gone," "You'll Never Leave Harlan Alive"), Scott has been making outstanding Americana albums... »»»
Playing With Fire CD review - Playing With Fire
If you happened to hear Jennifer Nettles' debut solo record, "That Girl," you may have come away thinking that she was a frustrated torch singer. That effort was chock full of emotive ballads, which, while heartfelt, sure was missing a certain element of F-U-N. Problem solved. From the opening sustain of gospel organ, Nettles storms out of the gate in a sensational tour-de-force.  »»»
Circle Round the Signs CD review - Circle Round the Signs
Credit the new wave of populist nu-folk/newgrass talent and troubadours for having made a profound impression on today's Americana legions. Bands like The Avett Brothers, The Lumineers and Mumford & Sons have influenced any number of artists that have followed in their wake, mostly banjo-thumping, rhythm-ready ensembles ... »»»
Detour CD review - Detour
There is an element of Pee-Wee's Playhouse running through Cyndi Lauper's country album, "Detour." Maybe it's just the way she speaks during certain song segments, with that girly Jersey girl-like voice of hers, which causes the listener to expect Cowboy Carl to suddenly show up. It's also due to Lauper's love of musical kitsch.  »»»
Ripcord CD review - Ripcord
Even though Keith Urban's single, "Wasted Time," borrows more than a little sonic sensibility from electronic music, there's still an upfront banjo solo. And this is how it's always been with Urban. He may play the part of the guitar hero at times, and even revealed his eclectic musical knowledge as a judge on American Idol, but Urban will always be a country boy at heart. »»»
Reckless CD review - Reckless
Stephen King tells us "Talent is cheaper than table salt." And what a shaker-full is contained on Martina McBride's latest. Songwriters? Hillary Lindsey, Sarah Buxton and Liz Rose are amongst the world's finest. For a producer, how about Faith Hill's or Taylor Swift's? And lest we forget - McBride herself possesses the best, hemi-powered soprano of any working singer today. This is gaudy, Dream Team level stuff. So, why isn't it better? »»»