Sign up for newsletter
 

CMA head to leave

Wednesday, December 2, 2009 – The head of the Country Music Association, Tammy Genovese, is leaving her post.

Genovese was with the CMA for 23 years, the last 2 in its top post. AEG Live! Senior Vice President and recently elected CMA Board Chairman Steve Moore is expected to lead the CMA on an interim basis. Genovese left effective today.

Genovese told The Tennessean, "I've been looking at (resigning) for some time," Genovese said. "Twenty four years is a long time. I have put my heart and soul into that company. This is one of the most successful years we've had, and it just felt like a great time to take a break."

"I have two wonderful kids and one of them is a junior, and one of them is going into high school next year. I'm thinking I've worked their entire lives, and I want to be able to spend a little bit of time with them and do some fun things I haven't been able to do."

It was not stated whey Genovese left her job on the day it was announced.

"Genovese...has successfully overseen the organization's continued phenomenal growth and financial stability even as music genres across the nation have experienced a slump," the CMA said in a press release.

"We are extremely grateful to Tammy for the commitment and talent she has brought to our organization through the years," said Randy Goodman, Chairman of the CMA Board and President of Lyric Street Records. "Tammy has made a positive impact in our industry and we wish her the very best in her future endeavors. We thank her for her many contributions to CMA."

Under Genovese's leadership, the 2009 CMA Music Festival hit an all-time high attendance record despite a downturn in the economy and a general decline in festival attendance across the nation. The festival experienced a 7.2 percent increase over 2008 during the 4-day event. The recent 43rd Annual CMA Awards, which aired live on the ABC Television Network before a sold-out crowd at the Sommet Center in Downtown Nashville, was the most watched CMA Awards since 2005.

"Jo Walker-Meador and Ed Benson taught me that success is built on hard work, passion and integrity. I am honored to have worked with these two amazing people and many other great music and business community leaders," Genovese said. "I am happy to say I have successfully carried on Jo's and Ed's tradition, and I walk away after 24 years, both gratified and proud of my accomplishments. 2009's success speaks for itself. I am forever grateful to the great staff and their hard work, loyalty, and dedication. My team has been the best, and I know they will carry on CMA's tradition of excellence and integrity."

Benson , who served as CMA's Chief Strategic Officer from January 2006 to August 2008, as its Executive Director for 14 years, and as its Associate Executive Director for more than 12 years, noted: "The fact that the CMA has experienced such substantial growth during a time when many companies are shrinking or closing their doors is a testament to Tammy's tenacity and business savvy. Tammy and I worked closely together for over 20 years and I know she will be successful in whatever her next endeavor may be."

The board will engage a search firm to conduct a national search for a new executive director.

Genovese began her career at CMA in 1985 as Administrative Service Coordinator. She was promoted to Director of Administrative Services in 1990 and then Director of Operations in 1992. In 1999, she was promoted to Associate Executive Director. In 2006, she was named Chief Operating Officer and within a year was appointed CEO in 2007. In that role, Genovese directed her talents and energy on CMA's mission and long-term strategic imperatives and external business relationships. Genovese holds a masters degree in business administration, which she earned while advancing her career at CMA.

More news for Country Music Association

Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Moakler does it his way – Steve Moakler told the good-sized crowd that he had played just about every college there is in the area. Now, that would be quite a lot and probably a bit hyperbolic. But the point is he's trying to do it his way. Without the benefits of commercial radio play or a label behind him, Moakler has benefitted from extraterrestrial radio playing his... »»»
Concert Review: Giddens captivates, engages – About the only thing wrong that Rhiannon Giddens did was play a too small 900-plus seat venue that sold out months in advance. Aside from that misstep of not allowing in even more of her fans, Giddens was captivating, engaging and certainly not afraid to continue as potent musical force, although she was far more overtly political.... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Lane assumes mantle of "Highway Queen" For most artists, eight years is a fair amount of time in their careers. For Nikki Lane, eight years represents the entirety of her recorded history, and she's filled that relatively short time span with a highlight reel of impressive accomplishments, not the least of which would be actually... »»»
The Avett Brothers come home to MerleFest For The Avett Brothers, MerleFest is a coming home of sorts. This year's edition of the MerleFest "traditional-plus" music festival in Wilkesboro, N.C., the event's 30th anniversary, a milestone sure to be marked by many different special appearances and commemorations during the festival's four-day run, is no exception.... »»»
Gibson Brothers rise up from "In the Ground" There's no more solid live bluegrass show than the Gibson Brothers. They play with great technical skill and crispness. Their harmonies are just what a brother act should be: sweet, true and never forced. Brothers Leigh and Eric Gibson surround themselves... »»»
The Devil Makes Three examine salvation, sin For nearly a decade and a half, The Devil Makes Three has concocted an amazing blend of bluegrass, folk, country, blues, rockabilly and whatever happens to bubble to the surface, and applied it liberally to their songwriting ethic.... »»»
Things Change CD review - Things Change
Hipsters may only consider checking out Bobby Bare's "Things Change" due to the participation of hot item Chris Stapleton, who sings on a remake of the old hit "Detroit City." Hopefully, though, they'll immediately recognize Bare's immense talent and stick around for the whole shooting match. Bare's no spring chicken anymore, but he sounds extremely good throughout this classic-sounding country effort.  »»»
Postcard Town CD review - Postcard Town
Formed in 2014 in the far reaches of Sheridan, Wyo., a place well off the map as far as connectivity with the bigger marketplace is concerned, The Two Tracks make a sound that ought to be instantly engaging to anyone appreciative of a true down home delivery. Consequently, the band's sophomore offering, "Postcard Town," brings them as close to the mainstream as one might imagine. »»»
Transient Lullaby CD review - Transient Lullaby
Being part of Steve Earle's backing band, The Dukes, would seem to some a baptism of fire. Yes, The Mastersons - specifically, the husband and wife team of Chris Masterson and Eleanor Whitmore - not only survived but thrived, spinning off a solo career that's resulted in three excellent albums. "Transient Lullaby" affirms the promise shown early on, making them an obvious heir apparent to Gram and Emmylou, Johnny and June, Porter and Dolly. »»»
Road Less Traveled CD review - Road Less Traveled
A last name like Petite suggests a double entendre, not to mention a punch line for all kinds of cheap jokes. So imagine the surprise that comes with the first discovery of Sara Petite's songs and singing. Big, bold and brassy, she comes across like an artist with a timeless resume, a whirlwind of musical expression who creates an ageless sound prepped by cool and confidence.  »»»