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Houser plays pre-CMA songwriters gig

Tuesday, October 20, 2009 – The CMA Songwriters Series will pave the way to The 43rd Annual CMA Awards with a show featuring Randy Houser, Brett James, Rivers Rutherford and Victoria Shaw at Nashville's Limelight on Tuesday, Nov. 10.

The series, which has played to sell-out shows in New York City for the past five years and recently held performances in Los Angeles and Chicago, comes home to Nashville on the night prior to CMA.

The series allows fans to hear the songs by the people who wrote them. In addition, the writers often share the stories behind those songs.

Houser, the featured artist/songwriter for this CMA Songwriters Series, burst on the scene this year with his Top 20 hit Anything Goes from his debut album of the same name. His subsequent single, Boots On, hit the Top 10. Houser also garnered two CMA Award nominations for New Artist of the Year and Music Video of the Year for Boots On (directed by Eric Welch). In addition, Houser has written songs that have been recorded by Trace Adkins (Honky Tonk Badonkadonk) and Justin Moore (Back That Thing Up).

James (Jesus Take the Wheel recorded by Carrie Underwood, When the Sun Goes Down recorded by Kenny Chesney and Blessed recorded by Martina McBride) and Rivers Rutherford (Ain't Nothin' Bout You recorded by Brooks & Dunn, Real Good Man recorded by Tim McGraw and If You Ever Stop Loving Me recorded by Montgomery Gentry) and Shaw (The River recorded by Garth Brooks, I Love the Way You Love Me recorded by John Michael Montgomery and Where Your Road Leads recorded by Trisha Yearwood with Brooks) are on the bill. Shaw received her first CMA Award nomination this year in the Single of the Year category for producing the Lady Antebellum hit, I Run to You.

Tickets for the Nov. 10 CMA Songwriters Series are $10 and go on sale today.

More news for Randy Houser

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Fired Up CD review - Fired Up
A brand of neo-traditional country music has entered the mainstream scene in response to the hip hop beats of bro country and smooth EDM of metro country. Artists like Aaron Watson and Randy Houser are providing a strong alternative on the charts for fans who prefer their country closer to its roots. The challenge for a country artist today is to find a balance between the fans and their business. A small handful of writers are responsible for most of the mainstream chart toppers, resulting in a »»»
How Country Feels CD review - How Country Feels
Despite a good track record of releasing quality music, Randy Houser hasn't become a consistent chart-topper yet. His new album, "How Country Feels," has already brought him one hit song with the title track, so perhaps a change of scenery (Houser is now on Stoney Creek) was what his career needed. Houser's last album, "They Call Me Cadillac," was a bluesy, varied album that unfortunately yielded no hits. This time around, he's gone for a much simpler »»»
They Call Me Cadillac CD review - They Call Me Cadillac
Country music needs more true country songs, not more songs proving country credentials. Randy Houser's latest contains a few examples of the former. After bragging unnecessarily in one verse about liking to "smoke from my left hand," he ends the chorus to Whistlin' Dixie by stating, "I ain't just Whistlin' Dixie." Then on the bluesy, rocking Out Here In The Country he tells us, "Them city lights ain't my cup of tea." But this bluster all »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile brings thoughtfulness – Brandi Carlile returned to the GRAMMY Museum for the third time, and it's easy to see why she's always invited back. The evening began with GRAMMY Executive Scott Goldman interviewing Carlile on a pair of stuffed chairs, which was followed directly by a brief set of live songs. The interview portion was informative, while Carlile's... »»»
Concert Review: LSD tour provides a lot of highs – This was not your grandkids' country, that's for sure. Even the name of the tour - the LSD Tour - was a throwback (albeit far before the principals were making music). But make no mistake about it. With the ever cool country traditionalist Dwight Yoakam, the country with some rock and blues and rabble rousing of Steve Earle thrown in and the... »»»
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