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Mike Herrera's Tumbledown releases new video

Wednesday, August 26, 2009 – Mike Herrera's Tumbledown is releasing a video today for their new single Butcher of San Antone through the Hot Topic's Shockhound web site.

The track is the second single from he bands self-titled debut album, released through End Sounds earlier this year. Herrera is best known as the front-man of MxPx, but has been writing country music since 1998, and claims Hank Williams, Johnny Cash and Bill Monroe as references.

Sticking to their DIY roots, the band teamed up with Dallas-based video director, Joe the Visualist (Joe Harris) to create their interpretation of a classic comic book from the '60s (Eerie Comics). Herrera illustrates the song as "the story of a vigilante priest out for revenge. It's a comic book, pulp-style story and is definitely set apart from our other songs. It's seedy and sleezy, just the way I like it. I think anyone can get into a story of murder and revenge. Don't you?"

The band, formed in Bremerton, Wash., consists of Herrera as songwriter/lead vocals/guitar, lead guitarist Jack Parker, standup bassist Marshall Trotland and drummer Harley Trotland.

CD reviews for Mike Herrera's Tumbledown

Mike Herrera's Tumbledown CD review - Mike Herrera's Tumbledown
Those familiar with Mike Herrera's work with punk band MxPx may be a little surprised by Tumbledown's country sounds, while those who mostly know the man for his Christian songs might be shocked by all the drinking numbers. But just like Mike Ness (Social Distortion) has done with his solo outings, Herrera has called upon the rebel side of Johnny Cash for his newfound inspiration. With Butcher Of San Antone, Herrera pulls off a good old murder song, which more than solidifies his »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Daniels wears out bows, but music endures – After each of the first few songs Charlie Daniels played, his 'fiddle tech (?)' exchanged his bow. Is this because he was playing particularly hard? Perhaps. Whatever the case, Daniels and his five-piece band clearly appeared to be giving it their all during the act's hour-and-a-half set. As it is the Christmas month, Daniels sang a... »»»
Concert Review: Rawlings easily moves out of the shadow – Every once in awhile David Rawlings moves out of the shadow of musical mate Gillian Welch to launch his own tour. While Welch, for whom Rawlings plays guitar, has the more prominent career, nights like this ably confirm that there is a reason does his own thing as well. Rawlings, who released the very fine "Poor David's Almanack" in... »»»
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