Kickstart Country Standard Time to Nashville
 Sign up for newsletter
 

Americana group honors Jim Rooney

Thursday, August 6, 2009 – Producer, musician and Jim Rooney will be honored by the Americana Music Association with the Lifetime Achievement for Producer/Engineer award at the 8th Annual Americana Honors & Awards ceremony, scheduled for Thurs., Sept. 17 at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville.

In a career spanning more than 50 years, Rooney did albums with John Prine, Iris DeMent, Tom Paxton and Peter Rowan - as well as his work on Nanci Griffith's Grammy-winning "Other Voices Other Rooms." Rooney's contributions as an engineer, musician, producer and songwriter has reached almost 150 albums to date.

"Jim Rooney is the number one reason I have a career," said Griffith, who also worked with Rooney on the Grammy-nominated "Last of the True Believers." "He gave me confidence in my writing, inspiration to write, and handed me the want ads to look for an apartment in Nashville."

Following his key role in the '60s folk revival, Rooney managed Club 47 (now Club Passim) in Cambridge, Mass., and lent his talents to the Newport Folk Festival, serving as both its Director and Talent Coordinator. After handling tour and production management duties for both the Newport Jazz Festival and inaugural New Orleans Jazz Festival, Rooney moved to Woodstock, N.Y. in the early '70s to manage Albert Grossman's Bearsville Sound Studios.

At home in Nashville for the past 35 years, Rooney has released a handful of solo records while producing artists including Townes Van Zandt, Hal Ketchum, Bonnie Raitt and more. Rooney has also authored two books, "Bossmen: Bill Monroe & Muddy Waters" (DaCapo Press) and "Baby Let Me Follow You Down: The Illustrated Story of the Cambridge Folk Years" with Eric Von Schmidt (University of Massachusetts Press). He currently splits his time between Tennessee, Vermont and Ireland.

More news for Americana Music Association

Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Fogerty lives up to his past – Once upon a time, John Fogerty eschewed any association with the band that made him famous, Creedence Clearwater Revival. But time, which changed a long time ago, heals everything apparently. Not only is Fogerty playing CCR songs, he makes those overwhelmingly the cornerstone of his very fine, invigorating night of music that were the soundtracks of... »»»
Concert Review: With Turnpike Troubadors, there's lots of good reason – The appearance of Turnpike Troubadours was a bit curious. The Oklahoma Red Dirt music troupe has not released an album since 2012's "Goodbye Normal Street." So, it's not as if they're pushing new product. They also had never even played Boston before. In fact, lead singer Evan Felker said he had never set foot in Beantown period.... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Kickstart Country Standard Time to Nashville
Don't try labeling Parker Millsap If you move in alt.-country/Americana circles, you simply cannot get away from the name Parker Millsap. He's certainly one of the biggest buzz artists of 2014. Better still, his self-titled album lives up to all the hype. He's a smart songwriter and a passionate singer and is essential listening for anybody looking for high quality contemporary music. Millsap also creates music appealing to a wide variety of musical tastes. You can make a case that he's a country guy, but you can also hear a lot of blues and folk. And if you attempt to put a label on him, he'll quickly tear it right off.... »»»
Simpson gets metamodern What a difference a year can make. Last year, Sturgill Simpson was overly anxious about the arrival of his debut album, "High Top Mountain." This year, Simpson is simultaneously anticipating the birth of his debut child and his just-released sophomore album, "Metamodern Sounds in Country Music," and his mood couldn't be more relaxed and joyous.... »»»
Mary Sarah builds "Bridges" What is not expected is for a virtually unknown artist, turning 19 on the day before her album release and finishing high school during the recording of the album, to be the featured artist, with Dolly Parton, Vince Gill and the late Ray Price lending not only their vocals, but also their most-beloved standards in country music. Texas-turned-Tennessee songbird Mary Sarah Gross - Mary Sarah is her stage name - saw that dream realized on her sophomore album "Bridges."... »»»