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George Strait goes for "Twang" in August

Tuesday, July 7, 2009 – "Twang," the new CD from George Straits, will be out Aug. 11, his label said today. The 13 songs include the current hit Living for the Night.

"It makes a papa proud to have my son contributing to the creation of this record," said Strait, who wrote the song with his son bubba and songwriting ace Dean Dillon. "We had a great time writing with each other, and then Dean adding his magic made it even more special. I hope the people that buy this record have as much fun listening to it as I had making it." This was the first time Strait has penned a song since I Can't See Texas From Here from his 1982 debut - "Strait Country."

Strait co-wrote two additional songs on "Twang," - He's Got That Something Special and Out Of Sight Out Of Mind. Bubba Strait also wrote the track Arkansas Dave. Co-producing with producer Tony Brown, Strait's 38th album, was recorded at Shrimpboat Sound Studio in Key West, Fla. It is the same studio where they recorded Strait's last two award-winning albums.

Songs are:
1. Twang - Jim Lauderdale, Kendell Marvel and Jimmy Ritchey
2. Where Have I Been All My Life - Sherrie Austin, Will Nance and Steve Williams
3. I Gotta Get To You - Jim Lauderdale, Jimmy Ritchey and Blaine Larsen
4. Easy As You Go - Steve Bogard and Rick Giles
5. Living For The Night - George Strait, Bubba Strait and Dean Dillon
6. Same Kind Of Crazy - Delbert McClinton and Gary Nicholson
7. Out Of Sight Out Of Mind - George Strait and Bubba Strait
8. Arkansas Dave - Bubba Strait
9. The Breath You Take - Dean Dillon, Jessie Jo Dillon and Casey Beathard
10. He's Got That Something Special - George Strait, Bubba Strait and Dean Dillon
11. Hot Grease And Zydeco - Gordon Bradberry and Tony Ramey
12. Beautiful Day For Goodbye - Doug Johnson and Pat Bunch
13. El Rey - Jose Alfredo Jimenez

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Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Great songs, not glitz, highlight Lynn tribute – An eclectic group of Americana artists gathered together for a relatively low-key tribute to Loretta Lynn on the eve of the glitzy Grammy Awards. In contrast to the expensive dresses and song sets displayed at Staples Center for the awards show TV broadcast, these performers were backed by a skillful traditional country music house band.... »»»
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