Sign up for newsletter
 

George Strait goes for "Twang" in August

Tuesday, July 7, 2009 – "Twang," the new CD from George Straits, will be out Aug. 11, his label said today. The 13 songs include the current hit Living for the Night.

"It makes a papa proud to have my son contributing to the creation of this record," said Strait, who wrote the song with his son bubba and songwriting ace Dean Dillon. "We had a great time writing with each other, and then Dean adding his magic made it even more special. I hope the people that buy this record have as much fun listening to it as I had making it." This was the first time Strait has penned a song since I Can't See Texas From Here from his 1982 debut - "Strait Country."

Strait co-wrote two additional songs on "Twang," - He's Got That Something Special and Out Of Sight Out Of Mind. Bubba Strait also wrote the track Arkansas Dave. Co-producing with producer Tony Brown, Strait's 38th album, was recorded at Shrimpboat Sound Studio in Key West, Fla. It is the same studio where they recorded Strait's last two award-winning albums.

Songs are:
1. Twang - Jim Lauderdale, Kendell Marvel and Jimmy Ritchey
2. Where Have I Been All My Life - Sherrie Austin, Will Nance and Steve Williams
3. I Gotta Get To You - Jim Lauderdale, Jimmy Ritchey and Blaine Larsen
4. Easy As You Go - Steve Bogard and Rick Giles
5. Living For The Night - George Strait, Bubba Strait and Dean Dillon
6. Same Kind Of Crazy - Delbert McClinton and Gary Nicholson
7. Out Of Sight Out Of Mind - George Strait and Bubba Strait
8. Arkansas Dave - Bubba Strait
9. The Breath You Take - Dean Dillon, Jessie Jo Dillon and Casey Beathard
10. He's Got That Something Special - George Strait, Bubba Strait and Dean Dillon
11. Hot Grease And Zydeco - Gordon Bradberry and Tony Ramey
12. Beautiful Day For Goodbye - Doug Johnson and Pat Bunch
13. El Rey - Jose Alfredo Jimenez

More news for George Strait

CD reviews for George Strait

Cold Beer Conversation CD review - Cold Beer Conversation
recording front. This surprise release shows an artist now in his early 60s completely capable of being the leading voice for his brand of country music, which is increasingly rare these days. Strait always has enjoyed a voice that resonates and is dexterous depending on the style. And the Texan sticks with the types of styles that brought him to the top - traditional country ("Let It Go," "Goin' Goin' Gone"), Texas swing ("It Takes All Kinds") and Zydeco »»»
The Cowboy Rides Away: Live From AT&T Stadium CD review - The Cowboy Rides Away: Live From AT&T Stadium
George Strait has been one of the most dependable country music stars for three decades. In this day and age, the Texan is a certifiable throwback. He's low key, not a self-promoter. All's he has done is churn out hit after hit for decade after decade. He has not been the kind of artist who put his finger up in the air either or trading his cowboy hat for a baseball cap. When looking up the definition of traditional country, George Strait sits at the top. Strait tackles 20 songs on »»»
Love Is Everything CD review - Love Is Everything
George Strait may have reached his seventh decade, but he shows zero signs of slowing down. In fact, Strait seems to be getting even more consistent as he gets older. Strait doesn't stray all that far from the formula that has resulted in superstar status. First and foremost, that means his sonorous voice is mixed far above the music, a very good thing. He is comfortable on everything including hard core country (pedal steel, fiddle and mandolin are not tacked on afterthoughts with »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Cactus Blossoms move beyond Everlys – The Cactus Blossoms most obvious comparison is the Everly Brothers. Yes, Page Burkum and Jack Torrey are brothers, and they sure sounded like it. But only playing the Everlys card in describing The Cactus Blossoms would have sold them short. While the harmonies played a large role throughout, Torrey enjoyed a number of songs where he was the lead... »»»
Concert Review: Richey needn't chase any more – The opening lines of Kim Richey's "Chase Wild Horses," one of the best tracks on her excellent new CD, "Edgeland," starts with the lines: "I don't chase wild horses any more/I'm all done running from the way I was before Things I've done that I ain't proud of / I can't even stand the sound of I... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Tyminski goes dark Dan Tyminski (known simply as "Tyminski" on his 2017 release "Southern Gothic") has traditional music roots and unassailable bluegrass street cred especially given his membership in Alison Krauss' Union Station. He is also a powerful songwriter and has been writing songs for himself and others for years now.... »»»
Washburn, Fleck create "Echoes" Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn have powerhouse individual talents; each has followed an estimable career path to where they find themselves today: making complex, but spare, records, writing music together and touring with their son Juno. Their new release, "Echoes In The Valley" features mostly songs written by Fleck and Washburn, banjos, Washburn's strong vocals and very little else.... »»»
Hillman bides his time Legends don't come any more legendary than Chris Hillman. The roll call of bands that comprises Hillman's half century in music reads like a wing exhibit at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame; Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers, Manassas, the Souther Hillman Furay Band, the Desert Rose Band,... »»»
Mr. Jukebox CD review - Mr. Jukebox
Apparently someone to forgot to tell Joshua Hedley that country music has passed him by. Where does Hedley, aka apparently known as the Mayor of Lower Broad, come off to incorporating honky tonk, Texas swing, western swing and countrypolitan all in the first three songs of his debut?  »»»
Volunteer CD review - Volunteer
Dave Cobb produced "Volunteer" for Old Crow Medicine Show, and while word on the street was that this promised to be a more rocking, less roots music effort, such talk shouldn't dissuade fans of the group's established sound from checking it out.  »»»
The Tree of Forgiveness CD review - The Tree of Forgiveness
Mortality is very much on the mind of John Prine on this, his first album of all-new songs in 13 years. Understandably. After all, this is a man who has survived lung cancer and squamous cell cancer, the latter of which took a toll on his vocal cords. He's also had two knee replacements and a hip replacement. »»»
Paco and Melodic Polaroids CD review - Paco and Melodic Polaroids
Paco is the name of Tim Easton's Gibson J-45, which he bought for $100 and a couple of trade-ins 30 years ago. The name was bestowed on the guitar in Paris by a Deadhead. It's been Easton's best traveling companion and songwriting aid. »»»
Find a Light CD review - Find a Light
Blackberry Smoke will never fit the mold of a mainstream country act the way, say, Midland has done. They love to rock way too much to ever tamp it down permanently. And the aptly named "The Crooked Kind" follows a rollicking, rock & roll path that feels like just the right road. »»»
Years CD review - Years
For the less informed, it might seem like the blink of an eye since Sarah Shook & the Disarmers dropped its first album but those of us paying closer attention know that last year's release of "Sidelong" was actually Bloodshot's reissue of Shook's 2015 album that she originally distributed through CD Baby. »»»