Sign up for newsletter
 

Rosanne Cash covers "The List"

Tuesday, July 7, 2009 – Rosanne Cash will release her 12th studio album, "The List," on Manhattan Records on Oct. 6, featuring Cash's contemporary interpretations of 12 classic songs culled from a list of essential country tunes that her legendary father Johnny gave her in 1973.

The idea for The List came about while Cash was on tour promoting her 2006 studio album, the Grammy-nominated "Black Cadillac" - a reflective song cycle about the loss of her father, mother Vivian Liberto, and stepmother June Carter Cash. During concerts, Cash told audiences how, when she was 18, her father became alarmed that his daughter appeared to lack a deep understanding of country music (having been obsessed with The Beatles and steeped in Southern California rock and pop music). He gave her a list of the "100 Essential Country Songs" and told her that it was her education and she should learn them all.

"The List was far-ranging and thorough," Cash says. "It was assembled from my father's intuitive understanding of each critical juncture in the evolution of country music. There were old Appalachian folk ballads and the songs of Jimmie Rodgers and Woody Guthrie. The influence of gospel and Southern blues were crucial. Then he segued into rockabilly and the birth of modern country music by way of Hank Williams and up to the present, which was then 1973. He also included a couple of his own songs. I endeavored to learn them all and it was an education."

"I looked to that list as a standard of excellence, and to remind myself of the tradition from which I come. This album enables me to validate the connection to my heritage rather than run away from it, and to tie all the threads together: past and future, legacy and youth, tradition the timelessness."

Produced and arranged by John Leventhal (Cash's husband, who also contributes guitar work throughout), The List includes Cash's covers of songs by The Carter Family (Bury Me Under the Weeping Willow), Hank Williams (Take These Chains From My Heart), Jimmie Rodgers (Miss The Mississippi and You), Hank Cochran/Patsy Cline (She's Got You), Merle Haggard (Silver Wings), and Bob Dylan (Girl From the North Country, done by Dylan and Johnny Cash in 1969). The album also features guests whom Cash admires, including Bruce Springsteen (on Sea of Heartbreak), Elvis Costello (on Heartaches by the Number), Wilco's Jeff Tweedy (on Long Black Veil), and Rufus Wainwright (on Silver Wings).

"The List" is the first album Cash has made since she underwent surgery in 2007 for a benign brain condition, from which she has fully recovered.

"If my father had been a martial arts master, he might have passed a martial arts 'secret' on to me, his oldest child," Cash says. "If he had been a surgeon, he might have taken me into his operating room and pointed out the arteries and organs. If he were a robber baron, he might have surveyed his empire and said, 'Honey, some day this will all be yours!'. But he was a musician and a songwriter, and he gave me The List."

Songs are:
1. "Miss the Mississippi and You"
2. "Motherless Children"
3. "Sea of Heartbreak" (w/ Bruce Springsteen)
4. "Take These Chains From My Heart"
5. "I'm Movin' On"
6. "Heartaches by the Number" (w/ Elvis Costello)
7. "500 Miles"
8. "Long Black Veil" (w/ Jeff Tweedy)
9. "She's Got You"
10. "Girl From the North Country"
11. "Silver Wings" (w/ Rufus Wainwright)
12. "Bury Me Under the Weeping Willow"

More news for Rosanne Cash

CD reviews for Rosanne Cash

The River & The Thread CD review - The River & The Thread
On her first album since 2009's "The List," Cash takes a journey back home down the rivers of music, memory, loss, and longing that run in cascading shoals through Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas. Produced and arranged by husband John Leventhal, who also plays guitar on the record and co-wrote the songs, the album also features an all-star cast of backing musicians and singers, including Kris Kristofferson, John Prine, Amy Helm and Tony Joe White. Leventhal's funky slide »»»
The Essential Rosanne Cash CD review - The Essential Rosanne Cash
Many top country artists have multiple greatest hits/best of/very best/super hits type collections and Roseanne Cash is certainly no exception. It's very rare that any single collection stands apart from the crowd, but that's exactly what this new Columbia/Legacy two-CD set accomplishes. Impressive in terms of both size and scope, this 36-song collection rises to the top of the hits compilation heap because it covers Cash's entire career. The set starts with the tender acoustic »»»
The List CD review - The List
When Rosanne Cash was 18 years old (and primarily interested in rock music) her father, Johnny Cash, gave her a list of 100 essential country and western songs, which included everything from Jimmie Rodgers to Bob Dylan, and now her 12th studio album contains Rosanne's version of 12 of those essentials. It's being called a "covers" album, but that sells it short. Sure, she's faithful to the melodies and where the original probably can't be improved upon - as with »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Daniels wears out bows, but music endures – After each of the first few songs Charlie Daniels played, his 'fiddle tech (?)' exchanged his bow. Is this because he was playing particularly hard? Perhaps. Whatever the case, Daniels and his five-piece band clearly appeared to be giving it their all during the act's hour-and-a-half set. As it is the Christmas month, Daniels sang a... »»»
Concert Review: Rawlings easily moves out of the shadow – Every once in awhile David Rawlings moves out of the shadow of musical mate Gillian Welch to launch his own tour. While Welch, for whom Rawlings plays guitar, has the more prominent career, nights like this ably confirm that there is a reason does his own thing as well. Rawlings, who released the very fine "Poor David's Almanack" in... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Washburn, Fleck create "Echoes" Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn have powerhouse individual talents; each has followed an estimable career path to where they find themselves today: making complex, but spare, records, writing music together and touring with their son Juno. Their new release, "Echoes In The Valley" features mostly songs written by Fleck and Washburn, banjos, Washburn's strong vocals and very little else.... »»»
Hillman bides his time Legends don't come any more legendary than Chris Hillman. The roll call of bands that comprises Hillman's half century in music reads like a wing exhibit at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame; Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers, Manassas, the Souther Hillman Furay Band, the Desert Rose Band,... »»»
The Cadillac Three creates its "Legacy" William Shakespeare noted a few centuries back that a rose by any other name would be equally aromatic, and that general idea has musical implications as well. The Cadillac Three knows a thing or two about maintaining a sonic identity after a name change;... »»»
With Stanley and Watson, sound isn't elementary Those aware of the late Owsley "Bear" Stanley likely know him for one of two reasons - his pioneering work manufacturing lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in San Francisco during the mid-to-late 1960s and his role as an innovative sound engineer. Most notably, Bear worked...... »»»
From A Room: Volume 2 CD review - From A Room: Volume 2
There is no bigger artist in country music today, perhaps even in American music, than Chris Stapleton. His appeal reaches beyond just the commercial country fans for his gritty bluesy approach. 2015's "Traveller" set a high bar, which was met by this year's release of "From A Room: Volume 1," which won Album of the Year in the 51st CMA Awards.  »»»
Down Home Sessions EP CD review - Down Home Sessions EP

Upon first glance at the track list of Cole Swindell's fourth installment of the "Down Home Sessions" series, one may get the impression that it is a covers EP. It features several chart toppers from other artists, including Luke Bryan's "Roller Coaster" and Thomas Rhett's "Get Me Some Of That." »»»

The Rest of Our Lives CD review - The Rest of Our Lives
The first full album from Tim McGraw and Faith Hill is an inspired effort, even though some of its songwriters may surprise you. The title cut, for instance, features pop ginger Ed Sheeran on its credits, while Meghan Trainor contributed to "Roll the Dice." »»»
Bloodshot Records' 13 Days of Xmas CD review - Bloodshot Records' 13 Days of Xmas
Label holiday albums can sometimes be like office white elephant gift exchanges because there's a little bit of everything on the table. Some stuff you like, while other things may have been better left unwrapped. »»»
Texoma Shore CD review - Texoma Shore
Blake Shelton's 11th studio album finds The Voice advisor in a contented, one might even say homey, frame of mind. The opening track and first single "I'll Name the Dogs" sets the tone. It's a rollicking ode to domesticity that manages to make household chore distribution ("You find the spot and I'll find the money / You be the pretty and I'll be the funny") both romantic and amusing.  »»»
A Storyteller's Memory CD review - A Storyteller's Memory

Remington Ryde made a promise to James King to keep his music alive, and with the release of "A Storyteller's Memory," the group kept its word. The band's first recording with Pinecastle Records is a tribute to the late King that includes some of his most memorable stories and songs. »»»