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Rosanne Cash covers "The List"

Tuesday, July 7, 2009 – Rosanne Cash will release her 12th studio album, "The List," on Manhattan Records on Oct. 6, featuring Cash's contemporary interpretations of 12 classic songs culled from a list of essential country tunes that her legendary father Johnny gave her in 1973.

The idea for The List came about while Cash was on tour promoting her 2006 studio album, the Grammy-nominated "Black Cadillac" - a reflective song cycle about the loss of her father, mother Vivian Liberto, and stepmother June Carter Cash. During concerts, Cash told audiences how, when she was 18, her father became alarmed that his daughter appeared to lack a deep understanding of country music (having been obsessed with The Beatles and steeped in Southern California rock and pop music). He gave her a list of the "100 Essential Country Songs" and told her that it was her education and she should learn them all.

"The List was far-ranging and thorough," Cash says. "It was assembled from my father's intuitive understanding of each critical juncture in the evolution of country music. There were old Appalachian folk ballads and the songs of Jimmie Rodgers and Woody Guthrie. The influence of gospel and Southern blues were crucial. Then he segued into rockabilly and the birth of modern country music by way of Hank Williams and up to the present, which was then 1973. He also included a couple of his own songs. I endeavored to learn them all and it was an education."

"I looked to that list as a standard of excellence, and to remind myself of the tradition from which I come. This album enables me to validate the connection to my heritage rather than run away from it, and to tie all the threads together: past and future, legacy and youth, tradition the timelessness."

Produced and arranged by John Leventhal (Cash's husband, who also contributes guitar work throughout), The List includes Cash's covers of songs by The Carter Family (Bury Me Under the Weeping Willow), Hank Williams (Take These Chains From My Heart), Jimmie Rodgers (Miss The Mississippi and You), Hank Cochran/Patsy Cline (She's Got You), Merle Haggard (Silver Wings), and Bob Dylan (Girl From the North Country, done by Dylan and Johnny Cash in 1969). The album also features guests whom Cash admires, including Bruce Springsteen (on Sea of Heartbreak), Elvis Costello (on Heartaches by the Number), Wilco's Jeff Tweedy (on Long Black Veil), and Rufus Wainwright (on Silver Wings).

"The List" is the first album Cash has made since she underwent surgery in 2007 for a benign brain condition, from which she has fully recovered.

"If my father had been a martial arts master, he might have passed a martial arts 'secret' on to me, his oldest child," Cash says. "If he had been a surgeon, he might have taken me into his operating room and pointed out the arteries and organs. If he were a robber baron, he might have surveyed his empire and said, 'Honey, some day this will all be yours!'. But he was a musician and a songwriter, and he gave me The List."

Songs are:
1. "Miss the Mississippi and You"
2. "Motherless Children"
3. "Sea of Heartbreak" (w/ Bruce Springsteen)
4. "Take These Chains From My Heart"
5. "I'm Movin' On"
6. "Heartaches by the Number" (w/ Elvis Costello)
7. "500 Miles"
8. "Long Black Veil" (w/ Jeff Tweedy)
9. "She's Got You"
10. "Girl From the North Country"
11. "Silver Wings" (w/ Rufus Wainwright)
12. "Bury Me Under the Weeping Willow"

More news for Rosanne Cash

CD reviews for Rosanne Cash

The River & The Thread CD review - The River & The Thread
On her first album since 2009's "The List," Cash takes a journey back home down the rivers of music, memory, loss, and longing that run in cascading shoals through Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas. Produced and arranged by husband John Leventhal, who also plays guitar on the record and co-wrote the songs, the album also features an all-star cast of backing musicians and singers, including Kris Kristofferson, John Prine, Amy Helm and Tony Joe White. Leventhal's funky slide »»»
The Essential Rosanne Cash CD review - The Essential Rosanne Cash
Many top country artists have multiple greatest hits/best of/very best/super hits type collections and Roseanne Cash is certainly no exception. It's very rare that any single collection stands apart from the crowd, but that's exactly what this new Columbia/Legacy two-CD set accomplishes. Impressive in terms of both size and scope, this 36-song collection rises to the top of the hits compilation heap because it covers Cash's entire career. The set starts with the tender acoustic »»»
The List CD review - The List
When Rosanne Cash was 18 years old (and primarily interested in rock music) her father, Johnny Cash, gave her a list of 100 essential country and western songs, which included everything from Jimmie Rodgers to Bob Dylan, and now her 12th studio album contains Rosanne's version of 12 of those essentials. It's being called a "covers" album, but that sells it short. Sure, she's faithful to the melodies and where the original probably can't be improved upon - as with »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Kristofferson gives insight, but no easy answers – When they say music gets better with age, they're not always just talking about songs alone; sometimes they're also referring to the listener. When Kris Kristofferson sings, "Well, I woke up Sunday morning/With no way to hold my head that didn't hurt," to smartly open "Sunday Mornin' Comin' Down," he... »»»
Concert Review: No sugarcoating, Welch dishes out an experience – Gillian Welch (accompanied, as always, by master guitarist David Rawlings), celebrated her "The Harrow & The Harvest" album with a powerful night of music. She apologized many times for the utter unhappiness expressed through this album's songs, admitting it's "not the most chipper album" at one point.... »»»
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