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Buddy Miller grabs five AMA nominations

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 – Buddy Miller received five nominations for the Americana Music Association annual awards announced Wednesday out of six member-voted categories. Justin Townes Earle received three and Alejandro Escovedo, The Flatlanders and Australia's Kasey Chambers and Shane Nicholson each received two nominations.

"These nominations reflect the vibrancy and diversity of the ever-growing popularity of Americana Music," said Americana Executive Director Jed Hilly. "Our Honors & Awards show will again be filled with legends and the next generation of stars; it's going to be a musical night to remember."

Nominations were:

Album of the year:
Real Animal, by Alejandro Escovedo
Written in Chalk, by Buddy & Julie Miller
Jason Isbell & The 40 Unit, by Jason Isbell & The 40 Unit
Midnight At The Movies, by Justin Townes Earle

Artist of the year:
Alejandro Escovedo
Buddy Miller
Justin Townes Earle
Raul Malo

Instrumentalist of the year
Buddy Miller
Gurf Morlix
Jerry Douglas
Sam Bush

New & Emerging Artist
Band of Heathens
Belleville Outfit
Justin Townes Earle
Sarah Borges

Song of the year:
"Chalk," written by Julie Miller, performed by Buddy Miller & Patty Griffin
"Country Love" by the Gourds
"Homeland Refugee," by Joe Ely, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, and Butch Hancock, performed by the Flatlanders
"Rattlin' Bones" by Kasey Chambers & Shane Nicholson, performed by Kasey Chambers & Shane Nicholson
"Sex And Gasoline," by Rodney Crowell, performed by Rodney Crowell

Duo or group of the year:
Buddy & Julie Miller
The Flatlanders
Kasey Chambers & Shane Nicholson
Reckless Kelly

Selected by AMA members, nominees' eligibility is based on work released between June 1, 2008 and May 1, 2009. Winners will be announced Sept. 17 at the Ryman Auditorium during the 8th annual Americana Music Association's Honors and Awards Show. Hosted by Jim Lauderdale and featuring a band led by Miller, the ceremony will also recognize Lifetime Achievements and awards in Performance, Songwriting and the unique Spirit of Americana Award honoring Free Speech in Music.

More news for Buddy Miller

CD reviews for Buddy Miller

Cayamo Sessions at Sea CD review - Cayamo Sessions at Sea
Buddy Miller has done a lot in the music business. He's been a Nashville session player, a record producer, the musical director for the frothy, but entertaining, "Nashville" TV show. He does a weekly satellite radio with the talented, but dyspeptic, Jim Lauderdale. For the last few years, Miller has been a featured artist on one of a proliferating series of mid-Winter music cruises. Miller goes on the Cayamo cruise, generally in late January. The "Cayamo Sessions At »»»
The Majestic Silver Strings CD review - The Majestic Silver Strings
Buddy Miller is one of Nashville's finest guitarists. He's also a tasteful player. Therefore, while "Buddy Miller's The Majestic Silver Strings" may read like a guitar lover's dream, this is not just an excuse for Miller - along with his fellow guitar stars, Bill Frisell, Marc Ribot and Greg Leisz - to show off on said silver strings. In fact, this album is as much about great (mostly) female singing, as it is about string bending. For instance, it's such a »»»
Universal United House of Prayer
Buddy Miller has always been on the outskirts of mainstream country music, mixing influences from gospel to blues to bluegrass and hanging out with folks like Jim Lauderdale and Emmylou Harris. He continues to march to the beat of a different drummer on this, his first true gospel album. He sets the record up with a dark electric rocker, "Worry Too Much," in which he frets about the problems with the world. In the next song, a bright acoustic reading of the Louvin Brothers' "There's a Higher »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Great songs, not glitz, highlight Lynn tribute – An eclectic group of Americana artists gathered together for a relatively low-key tribute to Loretta Lynn on the eve of the glitzy Grammy Awards. In contrast to the expensive dresses and song sets displayed at Staples Center for the awards show TV broadcast, these performers were backed by a skillful traditional country music house band.... »»»
Concert Review: McBride soldiers on – Martina McBride said of "Reckless," her first country album in five years, that she wanted to get back to the old school, sorting through hundreds of songs from Music City's best songwriters and employing its best producers. As it turns out, it wasn't a very long trip. The Kansas native broke onto the scene with her 1992... »»»
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