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David Nail fans get Red Light

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 – is offering 10,000 free audio downloads of David Nail's current single Red Light. Visitors also can access to an acoustic performance of the song.

The download is available at

The Missouri native and son of a high school band director will take the Grand Ole Opry stage Saturday, May 16 for his debut performance, which can be heard live on Nashville's WSM and Sirius XM. Nail will showcase songs from his forthcoming late summer MCA Nashville release titled "I'm About To Come Alive," for which he wrote 5 of the 11 tracks.

"Alive" was produced by Frank Liddell and Michael Wrucke. Miranda Lambert lent her vocals to a moody Strangers On A Train, Rascal Flatts' Gary LeVox and Kenny Chesney both wrote songs, and a tune originally penned for Ray Charles kicks off the record.

In his career, Nail has released singles, but never had any hits or full-length albums released.

More news for David Nail

CD reviews for David Nail

The Fighter CD review - The Fighter
A singer's believability is essential to the success of any album, and David Nail has a way of persuading us that every word he sings on his "Fighter" comes straight from the heart. And it doesn't hurt that the songwriting contained within is topnotch throughout. Two songs, in particular, go straight to the heart in addition to being heartfelt. "Home," which Lori McKenna both sings on and co-wrote, is the first song on this record that will absolutely stop you in your tracks. »»»
I'm a Fire CD review - I'm a Fire
The struggles battling severe depression despite budding success and the adoration of peers and fans alike that David Nail endured during his journey to the recent release of his new album reads something like a country song of its own. And in hindsight, Nail's previous releases were brooding and at times melancholy. Unconscious reflections of his previously undiagnosed condition? Maybe. Nonetheless, the unmistakable positive vibe that shines through his newest album doesn't diminish »»»
The Sound Of A Million Dreams CD review - The Sound Of A Million Dreams
David Nail is a rare mainstream country artist who actually stands out from the rest of Music Row's regulars. Instead of leaning towards one of the two dominant styles of Nashville country, pop or rock, Nail blends country with soul and R&B. When he builds upon his strengths, the songs shine. The single misstep, Grandpa's Farm, sounds like a blend of recent Kid Rock and Dusty Springfield's Son of a Preacher Man; which is as awkward as the comparison sounds. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: For The Travlin' McCourys, Jeff Austin Band, the sum adds up – The concert was a homecoming of sorts for Ronnie and Rob McCoury, two of the mainstays of The Travelin' McCourys. After all, their father was born in the general area as were they. So, while perhaps coming home could have been the motivator, one got the distinct sense that that was just another night of "work" for the band, which... »»»
Concert Review: Wishing for more McKenna – Telling friends you just saw a Lori McKenna concert usually draws immediate blank stares. That is until you mention some of the more famous songs she's helped write for stars like Little Big Town and Tim McGraw. What your friends may not realize, though, is there are more great songs where those hits came from. McKenna's set list included a... »»»
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