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Chesney swings into action

Monday, April 20, 2009 – Kenny Chesney's tour swung into action Friday night at Mohegan Sun, a casino complex in Connecticut.

And this is what fans can look forward to - Chesney emerged from under a camera stand at the back of the arena floor, stepped over a bar that was rising - and began swinging towards the stage. The trapeze is wired to go right and left and side-to-side, allowing Chesney to fly to any section of the floor he wishes.

Chesney rode low over the fans heads, high-fiving and waving, as he moved to the right, then to the left. His rig also allowed him to turn in mid-air. While starting facing the stage, by the time he landed, he faced the audience. "I knew this was something we could do," Chesney said, "it was just a matter of figuring out how to make it safe enough - because there's not a whole lot holding me up there. And, obviously because we're not on a track, but cables, there needed to be different kinds of systems in place to make it work...but the tech people we work with figured it out.

"And what's so cool about this entrance - beyond the way it feels when I'm up there flying, which is a rush - is if I want to take somebody a beer in the back of section six or whatever, I could. We're still really learning what all the swing is capable of doing (and how to do it), but just being able to literally cover the entire floor last night was insane. Even more of a rush for me than running through the crowds to get to the stage."

The set opened with She Thinks My Tractor's Sexy. "This year, I wanted people rocking from a whole different place from the moment we hit the stage," Chesney said. "What better way to say, we're gonna hit you harder than ever than to open with the song we've bringing the show to its peak with for the last several years? Cause if we're starting there, then you know, we're starting pretty high and climbing from there."

"And I gotta tell you: those fans... those fans were so loud, so live, so ready... I knew we missed the crowds and being on the road, but they made us never wanna go home. That kind of energy, to create it, to feel it, to be part of it... that, to me, is what you go to concerts for."

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Live in No Shoes Nation: 10 Years of Concerts CD review - Live in No Shoes Nation: 10 Years of Concerts
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Cosmic Hallelujah CD review - Cosmic Hallelujah
The gospel, per Kenny Chesney's pseudo-spiritually-titled album, "Cosmic Hallelujah," is that the world is too crazy to make any sense of, and the only logical response is to drink more alcohol. (So, don't be surprised if there are more arrests for public intoxication at the performer's upcoming concert dates). Nearly every song includes lines about drinking alcohol - and not merely for the taste. This content will please many of his hard-partying fans. »»»
Life on a Rock CD review - Life on a Rock
Despite the carefree, cruise-line posture of most Kenny Chesney records, there's always a nagging suspicion that his party-time vibe is about as predictable as a plastic pink flamingo on a Palm Beach patio. Yet Chesney's career-long theme of girls, guitars, beer and beaches (not always in that order) - and the occasional piece of farm machinery - has yet to wear thin. And with summer fast approaching, that's okay. Chesney's latest is something of a running journal of his »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile warms hearts with empathetic thoughts – Brandi Carlile, dressed festively with a Santa hat, began her mid-week concert set with Joni Mitchell's "River" and closed with the carol "O Holy Night." In between, she sang about an equal measure of old and new songs. And on this first night of a short acoustic tour, Carlile was both in fine spirits and voice.... »»»
Concert Review: Daniels wears out bows, but music endures – After each of the first few songs Charlie Daniels played, his 'fiddle tech (?)' exchanged his bow. Is this because he was playing particularly hard? Perhaps. Whatever the case, Daniels and his five-piece band clearly appeared to be giving it their all during the act's hour-and-a-half set. As it is the Christmas month, Daniels sang a... »»»
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