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LeAnn Rimes receives ACM Humanitarian Award

Wednesday, February 11, 2009 – LeAnn Rimes will receive the Home Depot Humanitarian Award from the Academy of Country Music, it was announced today. The award will be presented during the 44th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards from Las Vegas Sunday, April 5.

Rimes has been particularly devoted to children's causes. She previously served as the International Spokesperson for Children's Miracle Network, which secures top-flight medical care for sick kids, and has supported Camp C.O.P.E., a service that teaches the children of wounded veterans to deal with their parents' altered lives. In 2007, Rimes partnered with Kellogg to draw attention to disabled veterans when she was featured on patriotic cereal boxes. She recorded the song I Want You With Me for this project and donated all proceeds from the song to the cause.

Rimes also financed construction of the LeAnn Rimes Adventure Gym at the Vanderbilt Children's Hospital in Nashville by contributing royalties from her 2000 hit single, I Need You. Additionally, she is an ardent supporter of the Nashville Humane Association and continues to speak out on the need to treat animals compassionately.

"I feel blessed to be able to help," said Rimes. "I strive to be actively involved in my community with my time and my heart, and I've been touched by the spirit and bravery of those I have encountered along the way. I'm honored that The Home Depot and the Academy have chosen to recognize my work and spread awareness of the worthy causes that inspire me."

Rimes will receive a crystal trophy designed by Tiffany & Co. during the live CBS telecast. She will also be honored with a playground donated by The Home Depot and their national nonprofit partner KaBOOM!, which envisions a great place to play within walking distance of every child in America. The playground will be built by The Home Depot volunteers and community members in the city of Rimes' choice.

"Philanthropy and giving back are core values at The Home Depot and something we share with the country music community," said Frank Bifulco, senior vice president and chief marketing officer at The Home Depot. "We're honored to recognize LeAnn for her long-standing dedication to helping those in need and raising awareness for the causes she supports. She represents the values of charitable giving and community service held by both The Home Depot and the Academy of Country Music."

More news for LeAnn Rimes

CD reviews for LeAnn Rimes

One Christmas Chapter 1 CD review - One Christmas Chapter 1
LeAnn Rimes hasn't always been the most consistent album maker over the years, but there's no questioning the quality of her singing. Here gospel-y version of "Silent Night" on this Christmas EP, "One Christmas: Chapter," is truly a thing of beauty. Then when she sings a slow, soulful "Blue Christmas," which features that beautiful yodel in her voice, it should remind you of that wonderful Patsy Cline quality in her early recordings. »»»
Spitfire CD review - Spitfire
Say what you will about the vocal chops of today's leading ladies of country - Miranda Lambert, Faith Hill or Martina McBride chief among them - but LeAnn Rimes is hands down, no doubt about it the best female vocalist in country music today. And it will be bordering on a criminal act - thievery of the first order - if she doesn't sweep every award country music has to offer with her latest. For most of the bulk of the new millennium every Rimes album has been a treat. »»»
Lady and Gentlemen
Among female singers in country music, with the possible exception of Martina McBride, no one can touch LeAnn Rimes' voice for purity, grace, power and tone. Nowhere is Rimes' vocal prowess more evident than on her latest record, a 14-song collection of hits not by the women of country, but by a cross-section of all-star male country singers. Perhaps the best thing about this collection is that Rimes puts her own stamp on each song. That's easier said than done, since these are some »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
Concert Review: Wolf rolls on with ease – Peter Wolf starts off his first disc in six years, "A Cure for Loneliness," with "Rolling On." Great title for a song, and as he would prove in concert, he lived up to those words. The song starts "You can lay down and die / You can lay up and count the tears you've cried / But baby, that's not me / There's a... »»»
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