Sign up for newsletter
 

Troy Gentry faces charges over bear hunt

Wednesday, August 16, 2006 – Troy Gentry of Montgomery Gentry pleaded not guilty Tuesday in Federal Court for the District of Minnesota in a 2004 incident involving killing a bear. Gentry pleaded not guilty to a charge of conspiring with a licensed commercial bear guide and the owner of a private game farm in Minnesota.

Gentry's lawyer said in a prepared statement, "While up in a tree stand, Troy used a bow and arrow to kill a bear that was running free in a several-acre fenced area in the game farm."

Reports said Gentry purchased a captive bear named Cubby for $4,650 from Greenly and killed the bear on Greenly's property. The kill was registered with the state Department of Natural Resources as if it had been killed in the wild, a violation of the law. The government claims that a videotape of the bear's death was edited to make it appear that Gentry shot the bear legally.

Lee Marvin Greenly, owner of a Sandstone, Minn., wildlife refuge that had wolves and bears on its 80 acres, also was charged in the alleged incident.

A jury trial is slated to begin in Duluth, Minn. Nov. 27. Gentry could face 5 years in jail and a $20,000 fine if found guilty.

"Troy is an avid environmentalist and hunter who supports and follows all game laws," the statement said. "Before he killed the bear, he was told by the bear guide that it was proper and legal to kill the bear, which was not a tamed bear and was never in a pen or cage. Troy used his correct name on his Minnesota bear hunting license and never attempted to disguise his identity."

"The allegation that the video of the bear shoot was edited for the purpose of mischaracterizing the circumstances of the bear shoot is false. The only editing done was to remove the ‘dead time' from the video tape (more than 1 hour long) reducing the tape to about 15 minutes. The video was for Troy's personal use and was never intended to be and was not used commercially. The bear hide was shipped under Troy's name to a taxidermist in Kentucky and prepared into a taxidermy mount.

"Troy is accused of knowingly and willfully conspiring to violate federal law by taking the bear and transporting its hide from Minnesota to Kentucky and later to Tennessee. Troy absolutely denies that he knowingly and willfully did anything illegal and is confident that he will be exonerated."

More news for Montgomery Gentry

CD reviews for Montgomery Gentry

Folks Like Us CD review - Folks Like Us
Where once Garth Brooks was criticized for not being country enough, today we have hip hop artists making cameos and artists like Sam Hunt topping the country charts with EDM songs. With no release since 2011's "Rebels on the Run," we see Montgomery Gentry return to a radically different country music scene than the one they were a part of at the turn of the century. Bro country has enjoyed a large amount of success in recent years, and it is arguable that this duo is one of the »»»
Rebels on the Run CD review - Rebels on the Run
Montgomery Gentry looked like the likely candidate to take over the country duo throne when Brooks & Dunn called it quits. But they disappeared from the scene and pop stars Sugarland filled the void instead. After clearing up some label issues and dealing with the frustration of recording an album that never gets released, the guys are back to represent the rock and roll side of mainstream country. With the recent mega success of guys like Eric Church and Jason Aldean, their timing couldn't be better. »»»
Back When I Knew It All CD review - Back When I Knew It All
When Montgomery Gentry entered the scene stomping their hillbilly shoes, their southern rock influences and "couldn't-give-a-damn" attitude shone proudly. After a few years and a few hits, their sound and song choices began to lean heavily toward the radio friendly. With "Back When I Knew It All" the duo promised to get back to the raucous sounds that brought them to the dance. And they almost made it, but not quite. There are three recurrent themes that pop up: »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Newport Folk Fest retains its beauty – With acts ranging from Ray LaMontagne to The Staves to Case/Lang/Veirs, the Newport Folk Festival ran the gamut from tried and true to not so well known to brand new (sort of) acts. And that was the beauty of day one of the festival in enabling attendees to sample a wide range of music and genres, albeit little of it folk as we once knew it.... »»»
Concert Review: Hensley, Ickes have a good thing going – Chances are strong that Dobro master extraordinaire Rob Ickes has used the line a time or two when he explained his instrument of choice as "a guitar played incorrectly." The line got the requisite laughter from the small crowd of about 25 in the intimate club. His sidekick, Trey Hensley, didn't offer any such comment.... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Lonely Heartstring Band navigates "Deep Waters" Four years after forming in Boston and a year after receiving their first major award (an IBMA Momentum nod), when most bands might be expected to have two or three already in circulation, the Lonely Heartstring Band finally has its first full-length CD release "Deep Waters" (Rounder) out on the street.... »»»
Bush tells the story Sam Bush is back with a new record, "Storyman," not that he ever went anywhere. Identified with The Telluride Bluegrass Festival, which he has played in one form or another for each year but one, he helped define the new grass sound. Starting with Poor Richard's Almanac (along with Alan Munde and Wayne Stewart) in 1970, continuing to turns with New Grass Revival and Nash Ramblers, Bush has played fiddle, mandolin and mandolin variants (including slide mandolin) solidly since that time.... »»»
Ladies and gentlemen, The Infamous Stringdusters Nearly 10 years on, The Infamous Stringdusters have carved out a singular place for themselves in the bluegrass/jamgrass world. The Stringdusters tour aggressively, are fixtures on the festival circuit and released several intriguing recording projects since late 2015: an EP of covers, including Tom Petty's "American Girl," and a full-length album of songs collaborating with some of the finest female singers in the Americana genre ("Ladies and Gentlemen").... »»»
The Fighter CD review - The Fighter
A singer's believability is essential to the success of any album, and David Nail has a way of persuading us that every word he sings on his "Fighter" comes straight from the heart. And it doesn't hurt that the songwriting contained within is topnotch throughout. Two songs, in particular, go straight to the heart in addition to being heartfelt. "Home," which Lori McKenna both sings on and co-wrote, is the first song on this record... »»»
We're All Somebody From Somewhere CD review - We're All Somebody From Somewhere
It's a difficult proposition for a band member to go solo after a longstanding highly successful career and try to forge a musical identity that not only isn't all that similar to what's come before, but is also able to stand on its own as musically viable. And despite some false starts in launching his solo career commercially on the country charts, Steven Tyler has managed to make a statement on both counts. »»»
Rattle & Roar CD review - Rattle & Roar
In the spirit of "if it was a good idea the first time around, it's got to be worth trying again," Jerry Douglas and his collaborators in the Earls Of Leicester return with a follow-up to their self-titled Grammy-winning debut of two years ago. On the off chance that you missed it the first time around, Douglas pulled the band together, not as just another "tribute" band... »»»
Young in All the Wrong Ways CD review - Young in All the Wrong Ways
Sara Watkins' voice is powerful. "Young In All The Wrong Ways" showcases her instrument admirably. Watkins burst upon the music scene in 1989, as part of Nickel Creek, teaming with her brother Sean and mandolinist Chris Thile. Nickel Creek had a solid run of recording and live music performances for a couple of decades before the members spread out into other collaborations. »»»
Storyman CD review - Storyman
It's been seven years since Sam Bush released a collection of songs (2009's "Circles Around Me"), but Bush has never left the bluegrass/jamgrass consciousness. He tours, mostly festivals, with his first-rate Sam Bush Band and has popped up as instrumental collaborator with Frank Solivan, Taylor Swift, Bela Fleck, David Grisman and countless others over the years. »»»