Sign up for newsletter
 

Troy Gentry faces charges over bear hunt

Wednesday, August 16, 2006 – Troy Gentry of Montgomery Gentry pleaded not guilty Tuesday in Federal Court for the District of Minnesota in a 2004 incident involving killing a bear. Gentry pleaded not guilty to a charge of conspiring with a licensed commercial bear guide and the owner of a private game farm in Minnesota.

Gentry's lawyer said in a prepared statement, "While up in a tree stand, Troy used a bow and arrow to kill a bear that was running free in a several-acre fenced area in the game farm."

Reports said Gentry purchased a captive bear named Cubby for $4,650 from Greenly and killed the bear on Greenly's property. The kill was registered with the state Department of Natural Resources as if it had been killed in the wild, a violation of the law. The government claims that a videotape of the bear's death was edited to make it appear that Gentry shot the bear legally.

Lee Marvin Greenly, owner of a Sandstone, Minn., wildlife refuge that had wolves and bears on its 80 acres, also was charged in the alleged incident.

A jury trial is slated to begin in Duluth, Minn. Nov. 27. Gentry could face 5 years in jail and a $20,000 fine if found guilty.

"Troy is an avid environmentalist and hunter who supports and follows all game laws," the statement said. "Before he killed the bear, he was told by the bear guide that it was proper and legal to kill the bear, which was not a tamed bear and was never in a pen or cage. Troy used his correct name on his Minnesota bear hunting license and never attempted to disguise his identity."

"The allegation that the video of the bear shoot was edited for the purpose of mischaracterizing the circumstances of the bear shoot is false. The only editing done was to remove the ‘dead time' from the video tape (more than 1 hour long) reducing the tape to about 15 minutes. The video was for Troy's personal use and was never intended to be and was not used commercially. The bear hide was shipped under Troy's name to a taxidermist in Kentucky and prepared into a taxidermy mount.

"Troy is accused of knowingly and willfully conspiring to violate federal law by taking the bear and transporting its hide from Minnesota to Kentucky and later to Tennessee. Troy absolutely denies that he knowingly and willfully did anything illegal and is confident that he will be exonerated."

More news for Montgomery Gentry

CD reviews for Montgomery Gentry

Folks Like Us CD review - Folks Like Us
Where once Garth Brooks was criticized for not being country enough, today we have hip hop artists making cameos and artists like Sam Hunt topping the country charts with EDM songs. With no release since 2011's "Rebels on the Run," we see Montgomery Gentry return to a radically different country music scene than the one they were a part of at the turn of the century. Bro country has enjoyed a large amount of success in recent years, and it is arguable that this duo is one of the »»»
Rebels on the Run CD review - Rebels on the Run
Montgomery Gentry looked like the likely candidate to take over the country duo throne when Brooks & Dunn called it quits. But they disappeared from the scene and pop stars Sugarland filled the void instead. After clearing up some label issues and dealing with the frustration of recording an album that never gets released, the guys are back to represent the rock and roll side of mainstream country. With the recent mega success of guys like Eric Church and Jason Aldean, their timing couldn't be better. »»»
Back When I Knew It All CD review - Back When I Knew It All
When Montgomery Gentry entered the scene stomping their hillbilly shoes, their southern rock influences and "couldn't-give-a-damn" attitude shone proudly. After a few years and a few hits, their sound and song choices began to lean heavily toward the radio friendly. With "Back When I Knew It All" the duo promised to get back to the raucous sounds that brought them to the dance. And they almost made it, but not quite. There are three recurrent themes that pop up: »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Smiles galore, Chesney appears happiness – Kenny Chesney smiled often during his performance at The Rose Bowl. This wasn't some showbiz smile, either - it was sincere. Chesney appeared to be truly happy to be there. On a hot night in July, when Chesney brought his exuberant The Big Revival Tour to Pasadena, the joy he expressed while performing actually made you forget about all the heat... »»»
Concert Review: Carll needs no crutch – Hayes Carll didn't even play his best-known song, "She Left Me For Jesus," during his 95 minutes on the small stage. And while chances are that some were internally clamoring for the typical Carll sense of humor, no one could legitimately say that the lanky Texan short-changed them. At 39, Carll, who meanders somewhere between the... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Watkins Family make time From their first, self-titled, major label release, the Allison Krauss-produced, "Nickel Creek," two-thirds of that trio - musical siblings Sara and Sean Watkins - have been in the musical spotlight continually since 1999. As for working with her brother off and on for most of their lives, Sara says, "We have been lucky...... »»»
Milk Carton Kids find themselves on "Monterey" Joey Ryan, half of acoustic folk duo the Milk Carton Kids, is girding his loins for the long trip from the band's Los Angeles home base to Australia. Although he's made this trip before, he's yet to acclimate completely to it.... »»»
Moreland gets high Sitting in a motel room in Houston after a weekend gig at the Mucky Duck, singer/songwriter John Moreland is in a pretty good mood. His career is on a major upswing, and he is riding some pretty big critical success of his latest release, "High on Tulsa." Moreland has a lot to be happy about with three cuts picked for the soundtrack of the hit TV show "Sons of Anarchy,"...... »»»
The Blade CD review - The Blade
Ashley Monroe gains more acclaim for other projects than she does for her own solo efforts. Monroe is one third of side group Pistol Annies. She sang with Blake Shelton on his hit "Lonely Tonight." She received praise for her first proper solo album, "Like a Rose," in 2013, although that was a release that stood on the strength of the songs because three singles produced zero hits. Can "The Blade" turn the trick? »»»
Bittersweet CD review - Bittersweet
Australian songwriter Kasey Chambers has never managed to gain the profile elsewhere that she has Down Under, despite consistently releasing great albums as a solo artist and as a duo with her ex-husband. Almost a full year after initially releasing "Bittersweet," Chambers is giving the strong album an official U.S. release. »»»
Watkins Family Hour CD review - Watkins Family Hour
"Watkins Family Hour" is an immensely entertaining new release from siblings Sean and Sara Watkins (of Nickel Creek fame) and their musical compadres, collectively known as the Watkins Family Hour. Esteemed participants include vocalist Fiona Apple, Benmont Tench on keyboards, Don Heffington on drums, Greg Leisz on Dobro and pedal steel and Sebastian Steinberg on drums. The result is a refreshing romp with all of the participants taking a turn at lead vocals at least once. »»»
Something More Than Free CD review - Something More Than Free
Americana guitarist and singer-songwriter Jason Isbell started as part of Drive-By Truckers and is now a drive-by revolutionary. "Something More Than Free" is his sixth release outside of the band and a follow-up to his 2013 award-winning album, "Southeastern." Isbell carries his group roots with him as he also makes a voice for himself, exploring his southern origins with a progressive nostalgia that's in-touch with audiences of all generations. »»»
Angels and Alcohol CD review - Angels and Alcohol
Alan Jackson, circa 2015, now might be, unfortunately, considered a retro artist. Jackson, thankfully, does not veer from his traditional country beat on his first new studio disc in three years. It's the traditional sound that makes him a throwback today. »»»
Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams CD review - Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams
After serving as a sideman to some of the most distinguished luminaries in the biz - Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Levon Helm and Mavis Staples among them- it seems well past time that guitarist/producer Larry Campbell would step out on his own and spotlight his skills as both a singer and songwriter. It's to his credit however that he opts to share the spotlight with his wife and collaborator Teresa Williams... »»»