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Prairie Oyster leads Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame inductees

Thursday, July 10, 2008 – Prairie Oyster heads the list of three inductees into the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame. Brian Ferriman will join in the builder category, while Wes Montgomery makes it in the broadcast category.

"We are thrilled that these three inductees will be taking their rightful place in the Hall of Fame alongside their peers," said CCMA Hall of Fame Committee Chair Lynne Foster. "Each of these inductees have played a significant role in the development of the Canadian country music industry and are all truly deserving of this distinction."

Six-time winners of the CCMA Group of the Year Award, Prairie Oyster recently released their eighth studio album, "One Kiss." The group consists of lead singer Russell deCarle, guitarist Keith Glass, steel guitarist Dennis Delorme, keyboardist Joan Besen and fiddler John P. Allen.

Ferriman was instrumental in the careers of artists such as Terry Sumsion, Terry Carisse, The Good Brothers, Gary Fjellgaard and Michelle Wright, all of whom released some of their major hit recordings on Savannah Records, a label founded by Ferriman. He has been the recipient of the CCMA Manager of the Year Award on eight separate occasions.

Montgomery was one of the most successful morning show hosts in history. Montgomery would often play country music on his local Top 40 radio station in Edmonton. Montgomery passed away in 2005 and posthumously received the CCMA Award for On-Air Personalities of the Year, Major Market with co-host Jackie Rae Greening.

All of the inductees will be recognized during Country Music Week, to be held Sept.r 5-8 in Winnipeg. The four-day conference will be capped off with the 2008 CCMA Awards on Monday, September 8.

CD reviews for Prairie Oyster

Blue Plate Special
Canadian group Prairie Oyster have won five Junos (the Canadian equivalent of a Grammy) as Country Group of the Year in their 20-odd years of existence. So why haven't most Americans heard of them? Who knows? Maybe they're just too good for American country radio. If that's their problem, though, this album won't help. From the fiddle-and-steel country shuffles, "She Won't Be Lonely Long" and "If My Broken Heart Would Ever Mend," to the haunting ballad of resisting temptation, "The Water's Deep," »»»
Only One Moon
The new release by Canada's Prairie Oyster covers the musical spectrum. The opening cut, "Ancient History," is a cut that would be at home in any Texas honky-tonk. The band moves east to Cajun country with "Lousiette" written by guitarist Keith Glass, who penned five of the 12 songs. The musical journey continues with "Such A Lonely One," a song that could just as easily have been done by Roy Orbison with Duane Eddy on guitar. The band hits a high point with "She Don't Get The Blues" a straight »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Womack planned a good night – Lee Ann Womack pretty much summed up where she's at these days in concluding her show with Don Williams "Lord I Hope This Day Is Good." The ever-strong voiced country traditionalist sang, "I don't need fortune and I don't need fame" with the concluding line of the stanza asking the Man upstairs to "plan a good day for me.... »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
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