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Waylon's backing bond joins forces

Friday, June 27, 2008 – Former long-time members of Waylon Jennings' band have formed Waymore's Outlaws as a tribute to the late singer with singer/songwriter Tommy Townsend on lead vocals. The band will make its headline debut at Franklin, Tenn.'s July 4th celebration.

"We're all really excited about getting out and playing this music that was such a big part of our lives, and I think Waylon's fans will really like Tommy's talents and energy on stage," said Jennings' longtime bass player/tour manager Jerry "Jigger" Bridges. "We wouldn't do this without the blessing of Jessi (Colter, Waylon's wife) and we plan to make her and the entire family proud."

In addition to performing Jennings' hits, Waymore's Outlaws will also back Townsend on his own music. He had a had some radio play last year with "Cowboys Want It" as half of the country duo Townsend O'Donnell. The duo parted ways earlier this year, and Townsend continues to sing, write and play as he pursues a career as a solo artist.

A native of Blairsville, Ga., Townsend had the rare distinction of being mentored by Jennings. He was a pivotal force in Townsend's life, and the two collaborated several times over the years, with Jennings playing and singing harmony on some tracks and even co-producing a full album on Tommy with Jigger Bridges.

Bridges, who spent 24 years on the road with Jennings, will continue to play bass and tour manage Waymore's Outlaws. A native of Red Bay, Ala., he strongly was influenced by the R&B emerging from nearby Muscle Shoals. Following a four-year stint as a staff musician at FAME Recording Studio, he moved to Nashville and began working with Jennings on the "Dukes of Hazzard" soundtrack. After contributing bass work on the Jennings' Greatest Hits album, Jennings asked him to join him on the road.

The band also includes the original drummer and right-hand man Richie Albright who began playing with Waylon and the Waylors in 1964 and toured and recorded with him for decades. He produced his first movie soundtrack for Roy Rogers' MacIntosh & TJ film, the music for the first series of the "Dukes of Hazzard" TV show and produced several albums on Jennings, Jessi and many other friends over the past 30-plus years. He most recently recorded and toured with Colter.

Fred Newell is a veteran of the Nashville studio scene who has recorded with everyone from Ray Charles to George Strait. In addition to being the staff lead guitarist on numerous TV shows including Nashville Now.

Lead and rhythm guitarist Eugene Moles was surrounded by the "Bakersfield Sound" via his father Gene Moles, Roy Nichols, Merle Haggard, Buck Owens and others. In 1976, Haggard asked him to play guitar until Nichols recuperated from an illness. He joined Buck Owens and the Buckaroos and played on numerous "Hee Haw" shows. He moved to Nashville in 1987 to be more involved in the recording process and later worked at the Grand Ole Opry for 10 years with Del Reeves.

More news for Waylon Jennings

CD reviews for Waylon Jennings

The Lost Nashville Sessions CD review - The Lost Nashville Sessions
One of the original icons of the so-called Outlaw Country movement, Waylon Jennings left behind any number of contemporary classics and albums that still resonate in Americana realms. Yet, when he passed away prematurely in 2002, one couldn't help get the impression there was more material yet to be discovered. These sessions, rescued from some dusty vaults, add to that legacy, if only for the historical importance gained through hearing them in retrospect. Originally recorded for a series »»»
Goin' Down Rockin - The Final Recordings CD review - Goin' Down Rockin - The Final Recordings
The title of this posthumously released 12-song set would suggest that Waylon Jennings let out one last howl of fury and rebellion before he passed away in early 2002. In actuality, these recordings feature the famed country music outlaw in a more sober and reflective mood. Whether writing fresh tunes for the occasion or drawing on underappreciated songs from his past, Jennings seems to be summing up the issues of his life before chucking it all in. Recently overdubbed by »»»
Waylon Forever CD review - Waylon Forever
Waylon Jennings will always be considered among the elite of country music. He was equally appealing as both a traditional country artist and that of a renegade, and this posthumously released CD done in conjunction with his son Shooter and his backing band The .357's can only attest to that point. It is a wonderful outing indicative of Jennings range from that of a rogue as on both Lonesome On'ry and Mean and Are You Ready for the Country to the reflective observer on the pristine Jack of Diamonds. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile brings thoughtfulness – Brandi Carlile returned to the GRAMMY Museum for the third time, and it's easy to see why she's always invited back. The evening began with GRAMMY Executive Scott Goldman interviewing Carlile on a pair of stuffed chairs, which was followed directly by a brief set of live songs. The interview portion was informative, while Carlile's... »»»
Concert Review: Twain thrives on eye candy visuals, music – Shania Twain TD Garden, Boston July 11, 2018 Early on during her Now Tour stop, Shania Twain uttered the oft-said lines that so many artists tell the faithful - this is a night to forget about everything else and just have a night of fun. In Twain's case, that might have been a most accurate sentiment because her show was designed with... »»»
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