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The Wilders appear on NPR Saturday

Thursday, June 26, 2008 – The Wilders, the bluegrass-based Kansas City band, will be featured on NPR's "Weekend Morning Edition" with host Scott Simon this coming Saturday June 28. The band will talk about modern murder ballads and their fifth release on Free Dirt Records, "Someone's Got to Pay."

CD reviews for The Wilders

The Wilders CD review - The Wilders
The Wilders have always been best known for their energetic live shows filled with hard driving acoustic traditional country music. Their new self-titled release, "The Wilders," has expanded their repertoire to new, quite enjoyable horizons. The record starts out uniquely with Ordinary People, a mellow opener with a great acoustic guitar that immediately opens the doors and hooks you. The lead vocals of Ike Sheldon drive home the poignant lyrics, accompanied masterfully by Phil Wade on »»»
Someone's Got to Pay CD review - Someone's Got to Pay
Murder ballads have carved the darkest corners of country music storytelling, but thanks to gonzo bluegrassers the Wilders, their full-fledged murder album has taken the quirky genre to a new level. Based on Wilders' multi-instrumentalist Phil Wade's experience as a juror on a 2005 murder trial, this is a riveting, intense 20-song tribunal laced with classic country, introspective ballads, fiery instrumentals and kick-ass bluegrass. More than a concept album, this is a compelling »»»
Throw Down
Known for a foot-stomping, fiddle-shredding live show, this Kansas City quartet delivers quite the good time on its latest. Co-produced by noted Appalachian and Cajun musician Dirk Powell and the band, this is energetic with a capital "E," well-played and focused. Appropriately, ace fiddler Betse Ellis strikes the first strokes on the opening "Hawk's Got a Chicken and Flew in the Woods," which she explains in the liner notes that she learned from a Rounder Records compilation of Ozark fiddling. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Daniels wears out bows, but music endures – After each of the first few songs Charlie Daniels played, his 'fiddle tech (?)' exchanged his bow. Is this because he was playing particularly hard? Perhaps. Whatever the case, Daniels and his five-piece band clearly appeared to be giving it their all during the act's hour-and-a-half set. As it is the Christmas month, Daniels sang a... »»»
Concert Review: Rawlings easily moves out of the shadow – Every once in awhile David Rawlings moves out of the shadow of musical mate Gillian Welch to launch his own tour. While Welch, for whom Rawlings plays guitar, has the more prominent career, nights like this ably confirm that there is a reason does his own thing as well. Rawlings, who released the very fine "Poor David's Almanack" in... »»»
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