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Heidi Newfield readies solo debut

Friday, May 30, 2008 – Heidi Newfield, former lead singer of Trick Pony, will release her solo debut, "What Am I Waiting For?," Aug. 5 on Curb. The first single from the 10-song disc is "Johnny and June," which is almost on the top 30 of the Billboard country song chart. The song is about Johnny Cash and his wife June Carter Cash. Other songs on the set include "Can't Let Go" and "Tears Fall Down," which Newfield wrote with Leslie Satcher and Al Anderson.

Tony Brown, who produces George Strait, handled that chore for Newfield as well. "He wouldn't have time for me," Newfield wrote on her web site, "between George Strait and Reba and Brooks & Dunn."

The two talked for three hours, and Brown agreed to produce her. "Right away, we just clicked. Right away, I think he got my song sensibility and was right on track with it. Loved that I wanted to step out from what I had been doing, kind of get out of the bar room for a minute."

More news for Heidi Newfield

CD reviews for Heidi Newfield

What Am I Waiting For CD review - What Am I Waiting For
Opening any CD with a cover of a song closely associated with Lucinda Williams is a gutsy move. But on her first solo release after amiably breaking away from her band Trick Pony, Heidi Newfield throws down the gauntlet. She kicks off "What Am I Waiting For" with the Randy Weeks penned "Can't Let Go," made most famous on Williams' "Car Wheels on a Gravel Road." It's a rollicking good tune and an unexpected showcase for Newfield's voice, which is »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Cadillac Three, Sellers do it their own way – The way The Cadillac Three lead singer Jaren Johnston told it, the band could have had their choice of opening tours this year for the likes of Kenny Chesney, Dierks Bentley and Jake Owen. No go though because the long-haired singer fronting the rough-and-most-definitely ready trio said the band wanted to do it their own way. Based on this most... »»»
Concert Review: Great songs, not glitz, highlight Lynn tribute – An eclectic group of Americana artists gathered together for a relatively low-key tribute to Loretta Lynn on the eve of the glitzy Grammy Awards. In contrast to the expensive dresses and song sets displayed at Staples Center for the awards show TV broadcast, these performers were backed by a skillful traditional country music house band.... »»»
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