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Clay Walker prepares for golf tourney to fight MS

Friday, April 18, 2008 – Clay Walker is preparing for a hole-in-one at the inaugural Clay Walker Charity Classic golf tournament benefiting Band Against MS. The tournament will be held June 30 - July 2 at the Pebble Beach Resorts in Pebble Beach, Cal.

The invitation only event will benefit Walker's public charity, Band Against MS (BAMS). Walker, who was diagnosed with MS in 1996, founded BAMS in 2003 to create awareness and fund research programs for those living with the debilitating disease.

"This is going to be an incredible few days...Pebble Beach is one of the most beautiful places in the country," said Walker. "I am thrilled and grateful to be able to raise awareness and funding for a disease that affects so many by combining two of my favorite things, golf and music.

During the event, Walker will give a concert with the golf at three different courses.

More news for Clay Walker

CD reviews for Clay Walker

Fall CD review - Fall
Close to four years passed since Clay Walker released a new disc, and not a lot has changed for Walker, whose very first single, 'Live Until I Die," hit number 1 in 1994. Walker continues displaying a very pleasant country voice with a good sense of emotion among the 12 songs (the second single, "Fall") on this Keith Stegall-produced disc. Walker turns in an excellent reading of "Before the Next Teardrop Falls," which boasts the late singer Freddy Fender lending backing vocals. »»»
A Few Questions
Clay Walker isn't in the kind of questioning mood this album's title implies; instead, "A Few Questions" offers simple and straight-forward answers to life's bigger questions. But since Walker is not what you might consider a deep thinker, his latest release adds up to a simplistic and unfulfilling offering. A good example of this recording's shallowness is the clich+-ridden "Everybody Needs Love," which endlessly repeats stereotypes about Nashvillians and Texans, without ever telling us anything »»»
Christmas
Clay Walker fans expecting fiddle-and-steel arrangements of traditional Christmas songs may be disappointed. Walker fans willing to keep an open mind (and ear), on the other hand, may be pleasantly surprised. Sure, we get a fiddle solo on "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," but it's followed by a saxophone solo. The best song, surprisingly, is "Go Tell It on the Mountain," replete with organ and hallelujah choir. Walker really digs into the vocal and turns in a standout performance. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Earls of Leicester mesh it up – The parts of the Earls of Leicester are extremely solid, but so is the sum. That became quite apparent when the bluegrass superstar sextet released its debut in September 2014 along with its first live foray into Boston. Jerry Douglas, considered by many the best Dobro player on Planet Earth, summed up the evening just right when he said, hopefully... »»»
Concert Review: Watkins steps out on his own – At the ripe old age of 39, Sean Watkins is doing things a bit differently when it comes to his music. By far the biggest sign is that he is in the midst of his first ever solo headlining tour. That may seem a bit odd almost after having released four solo albums since 2001. But when you have your main gig being in the trio Nickel Creek, pus other... »»»
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