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"Pure Country" goes to the Great White Way

Thursday, April 10, 2008 – "Pure Country," the 1992 movie that starred George Strait, go the Great White Way because the movie will be the basis of a musical hitting Broadway in the 2008-9 season.

Producers Randall L. Wreghitt, Chris Presley and Ellen Rusconi announced previews start in spring 2009 with exact dates and a theater to be announced. No roles have been announced either.

The score will draw on the sounds of new and classic country, as well as Broadway and adult contemporary.

Steve Dorff, who has written 9 number 1 songs and 15 Top 10 hits (including such classics as Kenny Rogers' "Through the Years," Celine Dion's "Miracle" and the Country staple and hit movie theme "Every Which Way But Loose" by Eddie Rabbit) will compose the music.

John Bettis, whose songs have sold over 250 million records worldwide (writing everything from George Strait's "Heartland" to Madonna's "Crazy for You") is writing the Lyrics.

Writer and director Peter Masterson, best known as the co-writer and co-director of the hit Broadway musical The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (and co-author of the film), will direct and co-author the book.

In the music, Rusty is a country music superstar at the height of his career with all the high stakes pressures that come with it. When the pressure starts taking their toll, and he walks out of an overblown concert tour, his search begins to find himself and the love he left behind.

"PURE COUNTRY" is based on the 1992 Warner Brothers' film of the same name, written by Rex McGee and directed by Christopher Cain. It starred George Strait (in his film debut), Lesley Ann Warren, Kyle Chandler and Rory Calhoun (in his final film appearance). The soundtrack went to number one on the U.S. country album chart and spawned two number one country singles, "Heartland" and "I Cross My Heart." Both songs were written and co-produced by Dorff,

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