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"Pure Country" goes to the Great White Way

Thursday, April 10, 2008 – "Pure Country," the 1992 movie that starred George Strait, go the Great White Way because the movie will be the basis of a musical hitting Broadway in the 2008-9 season.

Producers Randall L. Wreghitt, Chris Presley and Ellen Rusconi announced previews start in spring 2009 with exact dates and a theater to be announced. No roles have been announced either.

The score will draw on the sounds of new and classic country, as well as Broadway and adult contemporary.

Steve Dorff, who has written 9 number 1 songs and 15 Top 10 hits (including such classics as Kenny Rogers' "Through the Years," Celine Dion's "Miracle" and the Country staple and hit movie theme "Every Which Way But Loose" by Eddie Rabbit) will compose the music.

John Bettis, whose songs have sold over 250 million records worldwide (writing everything from George Strait's "Heartland" to Madonna's "Crazy for You") is writing the Lyrics.

Writer and director Peter Masterson, best known as the co-writer and co-director of the hit Broadway musical The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (and co-author of the film), will direct and co-author the book.

In the music, Rusty is a country music superstar at the height of his career with all the high stakes pressures that come with it. When the pressure starts taking their toll, and he walks out of an overblown concert tour, his search begins to find himself and the love he left behind.

"PURE COUNTRY" is based on the 1992 Warner Brothers' film of the same name, written by Rex McGee and directed by Christopher Cain. It starred George Strait (in his film debut), Lesley Ann Warren, Kyle Chandler and Rory Calhoun (in his final film appearance). The soundtrack went to number one on the U.S. country album chart and spawned two number one country singles, "Heartland" and "I Cross My Heart." Both songs were written and co-produced by Dorff,

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Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest Day 4: fest closes with everything from hymns to honky tonk – For the final day of MerleFest 2015, the programming ran from gospel music in the morning to the barroom honky-tonk of Dwight Yoakam's closing set. That wide range is what makes the festival such a success as it carries on the "traditional plus" design of the late Doc Watson. With the Avett Brothers in town for their Saturday night... »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest Day 3: it's homecoming day – A wet and overcast day did little to dampen the spirits of the artists or the audience at MerleFest on Saturday; typically the busiest day of the four-day long festival. With home-state heroes The Avett Brothers headlining the Watson Stage, it felt like a homecoming celebration all day long. Friday may have been the day for new talent to shine, but... »»»
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