Sign up for newsletter
 

Harp Magazine announces it's shutting down

Monday, March 17, 2008 – Harp Magazine, which started as a roots/Americana magazine, is closing its doors.

In an email sent last week, editor Scott Crawford wrote, "It's with a really heavy heart that I even have to write this. As many of you know, our cash flow had slowed recently. Due to various factors, including the current newsstand magazine slump, the majority shareholders of Guthrie Inc. Harp's parent company, have decided to declare Chapter 7 bankruptcy."

The current March/April issue is the final issue of the seven-year-old magazine. The magazine will not continue on the web.

Crawford said the bankruptcy would be filed this week. Crawford could not be reached for comment.

Crawford started the magazine in 2001 and sold it several years later to Guthrie Inc., which also publishes JazzTimes. On Harp's web site, Glenn Sabin, Guthrie's CEO, said the publication struggled to become profitable. "We purchased Harp in 2003, and it quickly became a first class product that was highly acclaimed for its often irreverent editorial approach and strong graphical package. Unfortunately, Harp's critical acclaim never translated into sustaining commercial success. Harp's lifecycle was ill timed with the precipitous decline of the music software industry, coupled with the consolidation of the consumer magazine newsstand business and rising paper and postage costs."

The announcement comes during a spate of announced closings of magazines. No Depression announced in February it was shutting its magazine after the May/June issue. Last week, Bluegrass Now announced it was folding its magazine as well.

The magazine started covering similar territory as No Depression and Paste Magazine. The magazine eventually veered towards more of a rock direction. Dave Grohl of the Foo Fighters, for example, is on the cover of the current issue. Other recent issues had White Stripes and Ween on the cover.

Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest showcases diversity on day two – Although primarily thought of as a "roots music" festival, the artists at MerleFest can and do come from a variety of genres and locales. On the first full day of this year's festival, that point was underscored with performances from not just bluegrass and string bands, but also rock 'n' roll, soul and international acts... »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest opening night showcases new and familiar Artists – Long running North Carolina roots music festival MerleFest is a family friendly affair that has proven to have appeal to different generations. The lineup for Thursday's opening night, then, could be seen as a mirror to that audience as it contained artists ranging from multiple-year veterans of the festival down to first-year rookies.... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Reams leaps into "Rhyme & Season" James Reams is one of bluegrass music's unconventional stalwarts. A son of Kentucky, Reams' journey has taken any number of unusual pathways since the mid-seventies. Producing albums for more than 20 years, Reams' ninth release of personable bluegrass, "Rhyme and Season," is a relaunch for Reams, an artist who has never followed a singular route. ... »»»
Solivan  turns to family, friends, heroes After scoring a 2015 IBMA nomination for Best Bluegrass Album for "Cold Spell," Frank Solivan tried something a little different this time around - an album of songs recorded by "Family, Friends and Heroes" (Compass). In an earlier musical life, Solivan served as stalwart in Country Current, the Navy's touring bluegrass band. Solivan left the service and formed Dirty Kitchen, a hat-tip to his background and continuing efforts as a chef.... »»»
Sellers garages her country Aubrie Sellers just may be onto something on her debut - garage country. After all, we've already witnessed traditional country, new country, neo-traditional, country rock, pop country and bro country. Sellers, a 25-year-old Nashvillian with a big time musical pedigree who released her debut, "New City Blues," in January, said the moniker came to mind as her bio was being written.... »»»