Sign up for newsletter
 

Harp Magazine announces it's shutting down

Monday, March 17, 2008 – Harp Magazine, which started as a roots/Americana magazine, is closing its doors.

In an email sent last week, editor Scott Crawford wrote, "It's with a really heavy heart that I even have to write this. As many of you know, our cash flow had slowed recently. Due to various factors, including the current newsstand magazine slump, the majority shareholders of Guthrie Inc. Harp's parent company, have decided to declare Chapter 7 bankruptcy."

The current March/April issue is the final issue of the seven-year-old magazine. The magazine will not continue on the web.

Crawford said the bankruptcy would be filed this week. Crawford could not be reached for comment.

Crawford started the magazine in 2001 and sold it several years later to Guthrie Inc., which also publishes JazzTimes. On Harp's web site, Glenn Sabin, Guthrie's CEO, said the publication struggled to become profitable. "We purchased Harp in 2003, and it quickly became a first class product that was highly acclaimed for its often irreverent editorial approach and strong graphical package. Unfortunately, Harp's critical acclaim never translated into sustaining commercial success. Harp's lifecycle was ill timed with the precipitous decline of the music software industry, coupled with the consolidation of the consumer magazine newsstand business and rising paper and postage costs."

The announcement comes during a spate of announced closings of magazines. No Depression announced in February it was shutting its magazine after the May/June issue. Last week, Bluegrass Now announced it was folding its magazine as well.

The magazine started covering similar territory as No Depression and Paste Magazine. The magazine eventually veered towards more of a rock direction. Dave Grohl of the Foo Fighters, for example, is on the cover of the current issue. Other recent issues had White Stripes and Ween on the cover.

Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Outlaw lives up to his name – If you're a country singer, and you use the name Outlaw as your last name, well, you'd better back it up. Los Angeles-based traditional honky tonker Sam Outlaw set the record straight, though, saying he was "going to confront it head on." He told the crowd of 45 at his Boston-area debut that he took his mom's maiden name at his stage name.... »»»
Concert Review: White follows his muse – John Paul White said he was unsure how many would bother showing up on this night. He expressed uncertainty even how big a crowd he would attract in his hometown of Florence, Ala. when this tour started a few weeks earlier. Perhaps White should not have been surprised. After all, he was one-half of the great late The Civil Wars, who turned in a... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Ladies and gentlemen, The Infamous Stringdusters Nearly 10 years on, The Infamous Stringdusters have carved out a singular place for themselves in the bluegrass/jamgrass world. The Stringdusters tour aggressively, are fixtures on the festival circuit and released several intriguing recording projects since late 2015: an EP of covers, including Tom Petty's "American Girl," and a full-length album of songs collaborating with some of the finest female singers in the Americana genre ("Ladies and Gentlemen").... »»»
Reams leaps into "Rhyme & Season" James Reams is one of bluegrass music's unconventional stalwarts. A son of Kentucky, Reams' journey has taken any number of unusual pathways since the mid-seventies. Producing albums for more than 20 years, Reams' ninth release of personable bluegrass, "Rhyme and Season," is a relaunch for Reams, an artist who has never followed a singular route. ... »»»
Solivan  turns to family, friends, heroes After scoring a 2015 IBMA nomination for Best Bluegrass Album for "Cold Spell," Frank Solivan tried something a little different this time around - an album of songs recorded by "Family, Friends and Heroes" (Compass). In an earlier musical life, Solivan served as stalwart in Country Current, the Navy's touring bluegrass band. Solivan left the service and formed Dirty Kitchen, a hat-tip to his background and continuing efforts as a chef.... »»»