Sign up for newsletter
 

Craig Morgan signs with SonyBMG

Friday, March 7, 2008 – Craig Morgan will sign with Sony BMG Nashville, he announced last night. Morgan's appearance on the stage was a surprise to the invitation-only group of industry movers & shakers, who warmly received Morgan, as well as the announcement.

Sony BMG Chairman Joe Galante said, "It's a rare privilege to welcome a new addition to the roster whose hard work and commitment to the music has enabled him, so early in his career, to build such a strong base with the industry and the fans."

A single is expected by early summer with an album early this fall.

The announcement came during Sony BMG Nashville's annual boat show event during the Country Radio Seminar being held this week in Music City.

Morgan, who announced recently, he was leaving Broken Bow, said, "I am as excited about this as I was when I signed my first record deal at Atlantic years ago. Sony BMG Nashville is simply the best of the best, and to have this partnership going forward is the greatest way I could think of to get my new music out to the fans. Joe and Butch (Waugh, Sony BMG Nashville executive vice president) and everyone at Sony BMG Nashville have already made me feel so welcome, it seems like this has been meant to be for a long time."

Morgan achieved much success at Broken Bow with hits "Almost Home," which was named Music Row Song of the Year in 2003, the chart-topping summer anthem "Redneck Yacht Club," and "That's What I Love About Sunday," which was number 1 for 5 weeks in 2005. His current album has spawned 3 consecutive top 10 hits: "Little Bit of Life," "Tough" and "International Harvester."

More news for Craig Morgan

CD reviews for Craig Morgan

A Lot More to Me
Craig Morgan has been called "country music's champion of the everyman." Not only did the native of Kingston Springs, Tenn. spend more than 10 years in the U.S. Army, when he came home he worked construction, wore the badge of a sheriff's deputy and even did time at a Walmart. For his first album of original material in four years as and his second for Black River, he makes it abundantly clear in the liner notes that he is a devout Christian and the tone of the album reflects »»»
This Ole Boy CD review - This Ole Boy
Craig Morgan likes to keep things simple. Once dubbed "country music's champion of the Everyman" he is best known best known for songs that espouse the core values of the genre: Faith ( That's What I Love About Sunday), good times, ( Redneck Yacht Club) and helping others ( Almost Home ). We get much of the same on "This Ole Boy," his first new music in three years and debut with Black River Entertainment. Disappointingly, the patriotism, religion and love »»»
That's Why CD review - That's Why
Craig Morgan flies under the radar, both personally and musically. He spent a decade in military service, is married with kids and loves dirt biking. He's an everyday American guy who just sings and writes better than most. Musically, his lyrics about patriotism, family, southern pride, faith, and love are topics so elemental to country music, that he's something of a musical conduit for the common southern man. Here Morgan teams again with frequent co-writer and producer Phil »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Perhaps not country, but Urban stars – After Keith Urban scorched a version of "Days Go By," a man in his mid-50s in a Led Zeppelin T shirt said to his rhinestone clad lady friend, "This is not country music, that guy's a rock star." Indeed, the chart topping Aussie further contributes to country's multiple personality disorder, but in a category other than pop.... »»»
Concert Review: Loveless translates her sound well – Once upon a time, Lydia Loveless was part of the country, maybe alt.-country movement, but over time the Ohio-based singer has strayed further from those roots. That was made ever more clear by her rocking - with edge - performance on this evening. That's not to say that there's anything wrong with Loveless' direction - it's just... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

The Devil Makes Three examine salvation, sin For nearly a decade and a half, The Devil Makes Three has concocted an amazing blend of bluegrass, folk, country, blues, rockabilly and whatever happens to bubble to the surface, and applied it liberally to their songwriting ethic.... »»»
For Shires, home is where the family lies Mercy Rose Isbell recently celebrated her first birthday and, ironically, the album she helped inspire has just been released. Synchronicity is a beautiful thing. Mercy Rose is, of course, the daughter of singer/songwriters Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires, two of the most gifted Americana artists working today... ... »»»
The Earls of Leicester rattle and roar Something old is new again. The Earls of Leicester, fresh from their first release in late 2014 and the IBMA Entertainer of the Year Award for 2015, followed that remarkable success with "Rattle and Roar."... »»»
Gunslinger CD review - Gunslinger
If naming your release "Gunslinger," you'd better let it rip and go for a harder country sound, especially if donning a black cowboy hat on the cover. The reality does not exactly match that sentiment for Garth Brooks, but at times he comes mighty close. »»»
Christmas Together CD review - Christmas Together
Listening to Garth Brooks' and Trisha Yearwood's new holiday album of (mostly) duets, one is once again reminded how Yearwood is one of the most underrated country artists, whereas - if we're being honest - Brooks is a little on the overrated side. »»»
The Life and Songs of Emmylou Harris CD review - The Life and Songs of Emmylou Harris
Perhaps no artist is so ingrained in the very fibre of modern Americana more than Emmylou Harris. Her presence is everywhere - in the music she makes on her own, in the music she shares with others, in the music that feature finds her simply settled in the background sharing supporting vocals or merely lending inspiration. »»»
Mountain Voodoo CD review - Mountain Voodoo
Balsam Range has been at the heart of mainstream bluegrass music since its debut in 2007. "Mountain Voodoo" is an ambitious, and successful, summation of the first decade. Vocal harmonies provide the core of Balsam Range's music. It's mountain music, to be sure, with lots of vocal range. »»»
Cosmic Hallelujah CD review - Cosmic Hallelujah
The gospel, per Kenny Chesney's pseudo-spiritually-titled album, "Cosmic Hallelujah," is that the world is too crazy to make any sense of, and the only logical response is to drink more alcohol. (So, don't be surprised if there are more arrests for public intoxication at the performer's upcoming concert dates). »»»
Highway Prayer, A Tribute to Adam Carroll CD review - Highway Prayer, A Tribute to Adam Carroll
Adam Carroll doesn't boast anywhere near the recognition factor of, say, Bob Dylan, Townes Van Zandt or any of the other far more famous singer/songwriters that astute insiders frequently compare him to.  »»»