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Wanda Jackson documentary airs on Smithsonian channel

Tuesday, March 4, 2008 – "The Sweet Lady With the Nasty Voice," a documentary about rockabilly singer Wanda Jackson will make its world wide broadcast premiere on Sunday, May 18 on Smithsonian Channel.

The film is the culmination of a 2-year journey with Jackson, now 70, in performances across the U.S. and Europe. Among those Interviewed are Elvis Costello, Patti Scialfa, Bruce Springsteen, Lemmy Kilmister (Motorhead), Slim Jim Phantom (The Stray Cats), and Terry Stewart, President of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Upcoming screenings of The Sweet Lady With the Nasty Voice include:

March 6-9 George Lindsay Film Festival, Muscle Shoals, Alabama

March 7-15 South by Southwest (SXSW) Film Festival, Austin, (Live performance by Jackson on March 8; film screened on March 9 and 14)

March 24-28 Buffalo Niagara Film Festival, Buffalo, N.Y.

March 27-30 Memphis International Film Festival, Memphis

April 17-24 Nashville Film Festival, Nashville

In the 1950s, Jackson kicked open the door for women in rock 'n' roll, and empowered female rockers to be in control, to be sexy, and to write their own songs. The film takes the audience from the beginning of Jackson's career at age 16 to the present day, where Jackson still tours and features never-before-seen film of Jackson's concerts with rock icons Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly, Johnny Cash, and Jerry Lee Lewis. Producers/Directors: Vincent Kralyevich and Joanne Fish.

More news for Wanda Jackson

CD reviews for Wanda Jackson

Unfinished Business CD review - Unfinished Business
During her heyday in the '50s, Wanda Jackson was frequently identified as "the sweet girl with the nasty voice." The rockabilly chanteuse more than lived up to the tag by maintaining a spotless image (even as she dated Elvis Presley) while peeling off raucous rumpshakers like Let's Have a Party and Fujiyama Mama. Although casual listeners eventually thought Jackson had retired or died, true fans knew she had shifted her focus to European markets where she remained a big star »»»
The Party Ain't Over CD review - The Party Ain't Over
Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame inductee Wanda Jackson teams up with Jack White of White Stripes for a horn and guitar FX heavy set of neatly chosen cover songs. Although frequently invigorating, at times, the 73-year-old Jackson sounds dangerously close to being blown off her own album. From the get-go, Jackson can be heard fighting - even triumphing over - the fat, brassy horn section guitar vibrato on Shakin' All Over and although the Johnny Kidd and the Pirates' version remains »»»
I Remember Elvis CD review - I Remember Elvis
This 14-song set with two spoken tracks paying tribute to the late Elvis Presley, is probably the CD Wanda Jackson's fans have been waiting to hear. Produced by crack guitarist Danny B. Harvey, it features spare, yet full arrangements that allow the Oklahoma-born rockabilly pioneer to put her unique stamp on some of the genre's best-known tunes. Eschewing her trademark growl, Jackson sounds surprisingly bluesy slinking through such Sun Records-era staples as "Good Rockin' Tonight," "Trying to Get »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
Concert Review: Not only is Turner traditional, he's popular – Every time Josh Turner reached for some of those wonderful subterranean low notes, which he often pulled out during his enjoyable night show, it was like a superhero applying a superpower. He didn't need this extra advantage to please his audience; he has so many quality songs stockpiled in his catalogue already doing the job.... »»»
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