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Toby Keith stars in "Beer for My Horses" movie

Thursday, February 28, 2008 – Toby Keith will take a break from touring to take the lead role in a film based on one of his songs, "Beer for My Horses."

A follow up to Keith's successful 2006 film "Broken Bridges," "Beer for My Horses" is named after Keith's number 1 single with the same title and video with Willie Nelson. The film will debut theatrically this summer.

The movie also stars comedian Rodney Carrington, Claire Forlani, ("CSI: NY"), Ted Nugent, Barry Corbin, ("No Country For Old Men," "Dukes of Hazzard"), and Tom Skerritt ("Brothers and Sisters") along with Nelson.

Written by Keith and Carrington, the movie follows the exploits of small town deputies and best friends who defy the local sheriff to embark on an outrageous road trip to save one of their girlfriends from drug lord kidnappers. Filming started early this month and runs through mid-March in locations in and around New Mexico.

Keith is very involved in the new film's creative process. "I'm a writer," he says. "That's a huge part of what I do. And while most of the time it's songs, I've had a lot of fun with Rodney putting together a screenplay that borrows a title from one of those songs. And now we're in the process of turning that script into a film with the help of a lot of great people and friends of mine. It's a gratifying and creative experience, and I'm excited for people to see the end result."

The movie is being produced by Keith and Donald Zuckerman and is executive produced by TK Kimbrell. Jeff Yapp and Leslie Belzberg will serve as Executive Producers for CMT Films. The director is Michael Salomon, better known for music videos.

More news for Toby Keith

CD reviews for Toby Keith

Drinks After Work CD review - Drinks After Work
If 52-year old Toby Keith has learned anything after 20 years, it is to stick with a winning formula. Working with longtime collaborators Scotty Emerick, Bobby Pinson and Rivers Rutherford, "Drinks After Work" is chock full of blue collar ethic, humor and some heartbreak. Most of the album is driven by big hooks and country guitar, However, Keith experiments a bit stylistically with computerized hip hop on the party anthem opener, Shut Up And Hold On, a Buffet-esque steel drum on »»»
Hope on the Rocks CD review - Hope on the Rocks
For most of the 2000s, Toby Keith albums have been predictable and quite honestly pretty boring. Keith's latest again is predictable, but this time around it's anything but dull. Perhaps it's the pared down selection of just 10 cuts, allowing Keith to cull and produce the best that he's written. His themes stomp through familiar turf - cold beer, curvy girls, curvy girls who drink cold beer - but there's a more convincing vibe from start to finish. »»»
Bullets in the Gun CD review - Bullets in the Gun
Toby Keith is back with his annual release, once again delivering a record stocked with blue collar scenarios and tales of life. While his songs do paint a picture, at times they lack the refreshing desire of something fresh and new. The record opens with the title cut co-written by Rivers Rutherford. This song tells a story, but leaves the feeling of having heard it before. Think Robert Earl Keen and mix in the Cliff Note version of Townes Van Zandt's Pancho & Lefty, without the compelling saga. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Making perfect sense of Striking Matches, The Secret Sisters – The pairing of Striking Matches and The Secret Sisters on tour makes perfect sense. Both are duos, although the Matches are male/female and the Secrets truly are sisters (Rogers is the name, not Secret). Both emphasize keen vocal interplay. And perhaps most importantly, they shared a very famous producer, T Bone Burnett. But when it came to the live... »»»
Concert Review: Whitehorse changes gears – Whitehorse, the Canadian husband-and-wife duo of Melissa McClelland and Luke Doucet, has changed gears. In years past, they were more on the roots side, but you would have scratched your head wondering where that went during their show at what is billed as a folk club. Only Whitehorse couldn't be accused of being folk oriented either in a tour... »»»
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