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Phil Stacey releases debut single Monday

Friday, January 4, 2008 – American Idol season 6 finalist Phil Stacey will release his debut single, "If You Didn't Love Me" to country radio on Monday, Jan. 7. The track, produced by Wayne Kirkpatrick (Little Big Town) and written by Wendell Mobley, Jason Sellers and Rascal Flatts's Gary LeVox, will be the lead single from Stacey's upcoming debut CD, scheduled for release in April.

"I'm so excited to have found this song and that it'll be my very first single," said Stacey. "The lyrics of the song mean a lot to me because it's a great love song that everyone can relate to and I feel like it tells the story of my marriage. I've been blessed with an amazingly supportive wife (Kendra) and with all the things we've been through together - whether it was in college, the military or even on American Idol - having her there made everything so much easier and put joy into everything we went through. I don't know where I'd be today without her."

Stacey grew up singing in his father's church in Fairfield, Ohio and studied vocal performance at Lee University in Cleveland, Tenn. In 2003, Stacey enlisted in the U.S. Navy where he served as a Musician Third Class at Navy Band Southeast in Jacksonville, Fla.

On American Idol, Stacey sang country hits "Where The Blacktop Ends," "The Change" and "I Need You."

Following his time on American Idol, Stacey toured with his fellow contestants over the summer on a 55 city tour before moving to Nashville with his wife and their two daughters to pursue his country music career.

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