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Lady Antebellum films first video

Wednesday, January 2, 2008 – "Love Don't Live Here," the first video from Lady Antebellum's forthcoming self-titled debut, is out.

Shot in Nashville at multiple locations by director Chris Hicky, the "Love Don't Live Here" video had all three members of Lady Antebellum - Dave Haywood, Hillary Scott and Charles Kelley - showing up on set at 5:30 a.m., with the final shot occurring at the main performance location, Springwater Lounge, later that night. "The video shoot was the longest day of my life - very fun but very tiring!" said Kelley.

"I've never been a part of anything like this," said Haywood of the day spent filming the video for the band's debut single, "Love Don't Live Here." "I figured it'd be like 3 people holding a camera, but it was a crew of 30 people doing lights, sound, camera work, setups, etc....craziness!"

"It was pretty high energy," agreed Haywood. "Lots of fun in a similar fashion to touring and studio work. Always something going on, never a dull moment."

The video gave the trio a whole new set of firsts, including lip-synching: "The hardest thing about lip-synching was trying to keep up with the double-time singing - that's when they speed up the track so they can get the slow-motion effect on camera," said Kelley.

"It was very weird to hear our song twice as fast." "We probably sang 'Love Don't Live Here' 75-100 times . . . crazy!" said Scott.

For Scott, the clothing aspect of the shoot proved fun. Outfitted by cutting-edge stylist Lee Moore, Moore described the look he had in mind for the young singer as "being inspired by 60s French new wave cinema, London flea markets, and 60's New York style rebel Edie Sedgwick. . .I was able to incorporate pieces like a Marc Jacobs's flannel pea-coat, purple aviator shades, a mod-era striped minidress and boots - all very vintage-inspired." The self-described "fashion-loving girl," was delighted with the results: "Lee is unbelievable. . .he is so talented - able to find pieces that are me, but still push my style boundaries a little too....and he always puts me in a mini." Scott adds with a grin.

More news for Lady Antebellum

CD reviews for Lady Antebellum

Heart Break CD review - Heart Break
Lady Antebellum may cause you to throw out many of your country music principles. They don't sing and play traditional country music, for starters. They're not cool like more rocking Americana artists. In fact, they're huge mainstream country stars. So, why are some of us still suckers for their sound? And why does the new "Heart Break" sound so good on the ears? Well, it's simple, but complicated. Hillary Scott is simply a wonderfully sincere singer. »»»
747 CD review - 747
Six albums into its career, Lady Antebellum pretty much has the formula down pat. Either Hillary Scott or long and lanky Charles Kelley assumes lead vocals with Dave Haywood also providing vocals plus guitars and mandolin in a bunch of songs easy on the ears with a story often involving a lust for love. The typical song ("Lie With Me," for example) starts with Kelly or Scott taking a stanza, followed by the other with both then tackling the chorus together. This has worked quite well »»»
Golden CD review - Golden
Lady Antebellum probably needed a change in direction after "Own the Night" dropped in 2011. The material was overly geared towards taking dead aim at the radio jugular and not the best material. That isn't the case this time out on the trio's fifth release because most of the songs veer away from being obviously radio fodder (except for the current singleDowntown with its soulful beginning and strong vocals from Hillary Scott), but that also doesn't man that this was the right change. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
Concert Review: Not only is Turner traditional, he's popular – Every time Josh Turner reached for some of those wonderful subterranean low notes, which he often pulled out during his enjoyable night show, it was like a superhero applying a superpower. He didn't need this extra advantage to please his audience; he has so many quality songs stockpiled in his catalogue already doing the job.... »»»
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