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Toby Keith's family wins suit in father's death

Monday, December 24, 2007 – The family of Toby Keith won a $2.8-million dollar award against a Tulsa, Okla. Company for the wrongful death and negligence of T.K. Covel, Keith's father, in a March 2001 car accident.

Elias Rodriguez and Pedro Rodriguez - doing business as, Rodriguez Transportes of Tulsa and the Republic Western Insurance Company, an Arizona Corporation - were found responsible.

Covel was driving a Ford truck that was traveling near Goldsby, Okla. when he was bumped by another vehicle, sending his truck across the median, where it was struck by a southbound tour (charter) bus. The Rodriguezes were in a 1996 Dina Viag charter-type bus loaded with 21 passengers at the time of the accident. They had purchased the bus in October of 2000. In the following month, November 2000, a bus servicing facility in Tulsa inspected the bus and found it was "urgently" in need of brake work.

An expert witness testified that Covel would have lived if the bus has been equipped with proper brakes and the driver had been properly trained to drive the bus The evidence in the case revealed the bus driver, David Perez, was not trained to drive a commercial bus and did not have a commercial driver's license. The jury concluded the accident was "clearly avoidable," according to Keith's publicist.

Initially it was speculated that Covel may have suffered a medical condition, thereby causing the accident because no one knew that a car had bumped his truck onto the other side of the I-35. Six months after the accident, Jeanne Sparlin, who was the driver of that vehicle, was charged with leaving the scene of a fatality accident. She later pled guilty to the charge. This collection of facts led the Covel family to hire an investigator to determine how the accident occurred and what caused Covel's death.

The unanimous jury verdict in the case answered these questions for the family, clearly establishing that Covel was not at fault. In addition, the jury found by clear and convincing evidence that Rodriguez Transportes acted in reckless disregard for the rights of Covel.

"We were only there to find the truth and the jury saw it so plainly that they awarded us a unanimous decision," Toby Keith said.

The plaintiffs in the case were Covel's wife, Carolyn Covel, his daughter, Tonni Covel and sons Toby Keith Covel and Tracey Covel.

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CD reviews for Toby Keith

35 mph Town CD review - 35 mph Town
Way back in the '90's, before millions of dollars, high profile political feuds and moguldom, Toby Keith could really sing and write a pretty good song! News flash! He still can on his nostalgic, 18th album. You can hear an unexpected Merle Haggard influence all over this record. The title cut, "35 MPH" evokes a Haggard vibe. Think "Roots Of My Raising - 2015" as Keith laments the loss of the commonplace, now gone forever. What could've easily been an appeal »»»
Drinks After Work CD review - Drinks After Work
If 52-year old Toby Keith has learned anything after 20 years, it is to stick with a winning formula. Working with longtime collaborators Scotty Emerick, Bobby Pinson and Rivers Rutherford, "Drinks After Work" is chock full of blue collar ethic, humor and some heartbreak. Most of the album is driven by big hooks and country guitar, However, Keith experiments a bit stylistically with computerized hip hop on the party anthem opener, Shut Up And Hold On, a Buffet-esque steel drum on »»»
Hope on the Rocks CD review - Hope on the Rocks
For most of the 2000s, Toby Keith albums have been predictable and quite honestly pretty boring. Keith's latest again is predictable, but this time around it's anything but dull. Perhaps it's the pared down selection of just 10 cuts, allowing Keith to cull and produce the best that he's written. His themes stomp through familiar turf - cold beer, curvy girls, curvy girls who drink cold beer - but there's a more convincing vibe from start to finish. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Aldean and friends stretch it out, way out – Jason Aldean's tour, "Six String Circus," gets its name from his recent single, "Lights Come On." And titling his tour after a guitar - and more appropriately an electric guitar - makes all the sense in the world. Each act on the bill, which also included A Thousand Horses and Thomas Rhett, use a lot of guitars - but mostly in... »»»
Concert Review: The Jayhawks remain in top form – It's usually a good time to catch a band right after they've released one of their better albums, and "Paging Mr. Proust" is one of The Jayhawks' best. Comprised of smart songs, which consistently put lead singer Gary Louris' engaging vibrato to proper use and instrumental textures that oftentimes stretch the Minnesota act... »»»
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