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Travis Tritt sues record label

Tuesday, December 11, 2007 – Travis Tritt sued embattled Category 5 Records Tuesday for $10 million in federal court, alleging that the company misrepresented itself and has failed to pay royalties to him.

Tritt issued his last album, "The Storm" on Category 5 in August.

Label head Ray Termini also owns Haven Healthcare, a nursing care facility company based in Connecticut, which is under scrutiny by the state for its treatment of patients along with questionable finances, which led to the financing of Category 5. Haven Healthcare filed for bankruptcy last month. Termini has denied the charges.

The spokesperson for Tritt could not be reached Tuesday night for comment.

Tritt alleged that he did not receive creative control in making his disc as promised. He also claimed he did not receive funds from Category 5 for royalties and promotional travel for the album.

More news for Travis Tritt

CD reviews for Travis Tritt

The Calm After... CD review - The Calm After...
If you ever wonder what exactly happened to Travis Tritt, it's entirely possible he's asking the same thing himself. To review, there once was a time when grunge and hip hop were ascending, and millions of displaced popular music fans turned to its country cousin. Singers like Tritt welcomed the legion of new fans and never once insisted they wear a cowboy hat - he didn't either. From a debut album in 1990 to a (chock full) greatest hits in 1995, Tritt's star shone bright. »»»
The Storm CD review - The Storm
In an attempt to once again crack the Top 20, which he hasn't seen since 2002, Travis Tritt is trying to reinvent himself as a soulful country singer a la Tony Joe White and T. Graham Brown. He's even hired American Idol judge Randy Jackson to produce So what did they think was a good choice for first single release? A cover of "You Never take Me Dancing" by the King of Soul himself Richard Marx - Yep, Richard "Right Here Waiting" Marx. This track has Tritt unable »»»
My Honky Tonk History
Travis Tritt is famous both for his hard-rocking tunes and his softer ballads, and he tries his hand at both (though more of the former than the latter) on his new CD, with mixed results. The title track is an attempt to reassert Tritt's always dubious outlaw credentials, and it must be said that he doesn't do his case much good singing about bleeding Bud Light - do outlaws drink light beer? The first single, "The Girl's Gone Wild" is fun, and undoubtedly the best country song ever based on a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Time makes a difference for Striking Matches – What a difference four months makes. When the duo Striking Matches debuted in Boston in late May, Sarah Zimmerman and Justin Davis capably showed off their skills, but somehow it felt like a lot of songs fell just a bit short. Davis and Zimmerman tended to cut a lot of songs abruptly, never letting them breath enough or fleshing them out.... »»»
Concert Review: Home Free sings out – Home Free, the Minnesota-based a capella quintet that first caught the nation's attention by winning the fourth season of NBC's reality competition The Sing-Off in 2013, is one of the most talented and unique acts in modern country music. The question has always been whether or not the group and their all-vocal style, which includes the... »»»
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