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Miranda Lambert wines up

Monday, December 10, 2007 – Miranda Lambert bran dis branching out well beyond music because Lambert partneered with an East Texas label to produce wine.

Miranda Lambert's parents, Rick and Beverly Lambert, introduced the Red 55 Winery. The label is named after Lambert's first pickup, a candy apple red 1955 Chevy.

"A good deal of time went into developing this private wine label and the reason is simple: We believe in families working hard together and celebrating success when it finally comes," a newsletter from Lambert said. "Just like wine, in the music industry there are no overnight sensations. Many years of hard work go into the product that the public ultimately experiences."

The Lamberts partnered with the family of Lou Viney Vinyards of Winnsboro, Texas to "bottle a wine worthy to put Miranda's name on. This family-owned vineyard exemplifies the very values that we honor...It is also our hope that you will experience the great pride that comes from working hard and celebrating success together in your own family."

Wines available go by the names of Red 55, Electric Pink (Lambert plays apink guitar), Belle and Kerosene.

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Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: No wonder life is good for Shovels & Rope – Things are go swimmingly - pun intended - for Shovels & Rope, the South Carolina-based duo comprised of husband-and-wife Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent. For starters, their new disc, "Swimmin' Time," debuted at 21 on the Billboard Top 200 in its first week just a few shot weeks ago. On the local front, the band was playing two... »»»
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