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Holidays introduces Carter's Chord trio

Friday, November 30, 2007 – The holiday season is introducing Carter's Chord, the trio of singing and songwriting sisters whose debut album, produced by Toby Keith, will be released in early 2008 on Show Dog Nashville.

Their version of "O Come, O Come Emmanuel" that the sisters taped as part of their appearance on the CMT.com web show "Unplugged at Studio 330" is in medium rotation for the holidays on the CMT Network and CMT Pure Country.

On Dec. 4, four songs by Carter's Chord will be available for digital download from iTunes. The group's debut single, "Young Love," will be released to radio on Jan. 14. iTunes will also offer downloads of another holiday song by Carter's Chord, "Santa Baby" plus "Boys Like You (Give Love a Bad Name)" from their upcoming album.

Carter's Chord is sisters Becky, Emily and Joanna Robertson, who were literally born into and raised within country music, thanks to their musical parents: Grammy-winning keyboard player, arranger and producer Barny Robertson and singer Carter Robertson, who toured and recorded with Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter during the height of the Outlaw movement from the mid 1970s through the early '80s.

The sisters were signed by Keith to Show Dog Nashville after a Valentine's Day, 2006 showcase.

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Carter's Chord CD review - Carter's Chord
It's unlikely Carter's Chord's "Summer Early '60s" will make country radio. But what Martina McBride did to raise awareness of domestic violence with "Independence Day," this fledgling sister trio of 20s-somethings take it to another level with a gritty, autobiographical song written by their mother about her childhood. And give Toby Keith credit for letting the sisters - Becky, Emily and Johanna Robertson - record it. It's classic American gothic, »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
Concert Review: Wolf rolls on with ease – Peter Wolf starts off his first disc in six years, "A Cure for Loneliness," with "Rolling On." Great title for a song, and as he would prove in concert, he lived up to those words. The song starts "You can lay down and die / You can lay up and count the tears you've cried / But baby, that's not me / There's a... »»»
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