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Category 5 Records owner faces state investigation into nursing home business

Wednesday, November 21, 2007 – A nursing home company owned by the head of Category 5 Records, the home of Travis Tritt, is being investigated by Connecticut for poor patient care.

Connecticut Gov. M. Jodi Rell said Monday that the state may need to take over some nursing homes operated by Termini's Haven Healthcare due to poor patient care and financial problems.

Questions also surfaced about whether Haven executives illegally used millions in Medicaid money for business and real estate issues such as starting the record label.

On Tuesday, Tritt's manager Duke Cooper told the Associated Press that the singer was upset about the allegations. "Travis being a family man ... certainly doesn't condone any of that, if it turns out to be true," Cooper said. "It's a sad situation."

Tritt is the label's biggest act. His latest disc was released in August. Sammy Kershaw also is on the label, which has several acts yet to release any albums.

The Hartford Courant reported that Haven Healthcare was fined more than 45 times over the past 3 years by Connecticut and federal health agencies. Violations included letting patients become dehydrated and develop bed sores and infections, which resulted in amputations.

Rell asked state agencies to review Haven Healthcare operations by Dec. 1. A state takeover of Haven properties is possible.

In an interview with AP, Termini said, "I'm confident that when they're done concluding their review, they'll come to learn what our resident families already know - that we provide outstanding and quality care."

Termini told AP that Haven Healthcare took care of problems found by the state. He also said the company did not misuse Medicaid and Medicare funding. Termini said funds spent on the record label and a lakefront house he owns came from refinancing company projects.

More news for Travis Tritt

CD reviews for Travis Tritt

The Calm After... CD review - The Calm After...
If you ever wonder what exactly happened to Travis Tritt, it's entirely possible he's asking the same thing himself. To review, there once was a time when grunge and hip hop were ascending, and millions of displaced popular music fans turned to its country cousin. Singers like Tritt welcomed the legion of new fans and never once insisted they wear a cowboy hat - he didn't either. From a debut album in 1990 to a (chock full) greatest hits in 1995, Tritt's star shone bright. »»»
The Storm CD review - The Storm
In an attempt to once again crack the Top 20, which he hasn't seen since 2002, Travis Tritt is trying to reinvent himself as a soulful country singer a la Tony Joe White and T. Graham Brown. He's even hired American Idol judge Randy Jackson to produce So what did they think was a good choice for first single release? A cover of "You Never take Me Dancing" by the King of Soul himself Richard Marx - Yep, Richard "Right Here Waiting" Marx. This track has Tritt unable »»»
My Honky Tonk History
Travis Tritt is famous both for his hard-rocking tunes and his softer ballads, and he tries his hand at both (though more of the former than the latter) on his new CD, with mixed results. The title track is an attempt to reassert Tritt's always dubious outlaw credentials, and it must be said that he doesn't do his case much good singing about bleeding Bud Light - do outlaws drink light beer? The first single, "The Girl's Gone Wild" is fun, and undoubtedly the best country song ever based on a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Gibson Brothers join "Brotherhood" in style – The idea of releasing "Brotherhood" by veteran bluegrass band The Gibson Brothers was a natural. The disc paid tribute to a long list of brother acts including the Everlys and lesser known acts like the York Brothers and the Four Brothers. While the younger Gibson, Leigh, sure gave Eric a ton of grief throughout the show - all in jest, of... »»»
Concert Review: Moorer, Gauthier pull for each other – In their own right, Allison Moorer and Mary Gauthier did not really need the other because each is most capable of headlining. But in one of those geniuses of booking, fans had the chance to see the two in a most enjoyable and alternative setting - a good, old-fashioned guitar pull. That meant that the two were seated in comfortable chairs on... »»»
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