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Trace Adkins, meet Donald Trump

Tuesday, November 20, 2007 – Will Trace Adkins soon be working with Donald Trump? That may seem like strange bedfellows, but the towering country singer is 1 of 14 contestants on Celebrity Apprentice, which starts in January 2008.

Carol Alt, Stephen Baldwin, Nadia Comaneci, Tiffany Fallon, who is married to Rascal Flatts's Joe Don Rooney, Jennie Finch, Nely Galan, Marilu Henner, Lennox Lewis, Piers Morgan, Omarosa, Tito Ortiz, Vincent Pastore, and Gene Simmons of Kiss will face off against in each other in a charity-driven version of the show.

Contestants will not be vying for a job with Trump, but the celebrity contestants will raise more than a million dollars for their various charities throughout the season. Not only will the final winner be crowned the first 'Celebrity Apprentice,' but he or she will also deliver a $250,000 bonus check to their designated charity.

All 14 celebrities will be competing in business driven tasks around New York City, using their fame along with their proven business acumen to win challenges, while ultimately raising money and awareness for their respective causes.

Just as in the regular "Apprentice," the celebrities will be subjected to long hours, grueling mental challenges, personality clashes, and intense scrutiny - all without the help of their regular support system of agents, managers, and personal assistants.

Certain tasks encourage the contestants to reach out to their network of celebrity contacts for assistance or donations.

"This will be the most exciting season of 'The Apprentice' yet - maybe even better than Season One. Our 14 celebrity contestants are incredible individually, and as a group, they will make 'The Celebrity Apprentice' one of the hottest shows on television. I promise you a fantastic new season," said Donald J. Trump, executive producer of "The Celebrity Apprentice."

The tasks will be judged by Trump and his advisors in the boardroom. Returning back to the boardroom are Trump's children (and colleagues) Ivanka and Donald Trump Jr., alongside longtime Trump Organization employee and "Apprentice" advisor George Ross. In a new twist, the boardroom will feature a "rotating seat," allowing a variety of famous business leaders and industry experts to join Trump in spirited judgment on tasks for the first time in the series.

More news for Trace Adkins

CD reviews for Trace Adkins

Live Country DVD CD review - Live Country DVD
"Live Country" is a concert film featuring Trace Adkins performing his biggest hits at The Paramount in Huntington, N.Y. Anticipation was high for this one because Adkins, along with Josh Turner, is one of our very best low-voiced singers. Perhaps poor audio quality is to blame, but Adkins' singing isn't nearly as powerful in this live setting as it is on CD. From the cheesy stage props to the casually dressed backing singers (one even has a headband that leaves her looking »»»
The King's Gift CD review - The King's Gift
Trace Adkins, with that wonderfully deep voice of his, is always a pleasure. He's like an actor (well he has acted actually) that never gives a bad performance, even in a poor movie. When it comes to evaluating Adkins' albums, it's all about the music he surrounds himself with and the songs he's given to sing. And with "The King's Gift," Adkins is placed in a nearly can't miss situation; he's singing mostly familiar Christmas carols, with a mainly »»»
Love Will...
Trace Adkins is all about love here. Not exactly a new topic in the canon of (country) music, but Adkins capably addresses the issue. He goes traditional from the get go on perhaps the best song here - When I Stop Loving You, penned by neo-traditionalist Marty Brown and Even Stevens. Adkins' silky, full-throttled baritone owns the song. Adkins always has been a strong singer with a big, full sounding voice easy on the ears. He takes a decent song - The Altar of Your Love which he helped »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Making perfect sense of Striking Matches, The Secret Sisters – The pairing of Striking Matches and The Secret Sisters on tour makes perfect sense. Both are duos, although the Matches are male/female and the Secrets truly are sisters (Rogers is the name, not Secret). Both emphasize keen vocal interplay. And perhaps most importantly, they shared a very famous producer, T Bone Burnett. But when it came to the live... »»»
Concert Review: Whitehorse changes gears – Whitehorse, the Canadian husband-and-wife duo of Melissa McClelland and Luke Doucet, has changed gears. In years past, they were more on the roots side, but you would have scratched your head wondering where that went during their show at what is billed as a folk club. Only Whitehorse couldn't be accused of being folk oriented either in a tour... »»»
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