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John Hughey, steel player for Gill, Twitty, dies

Monday, November 19, 2007 – Long-time steel guitar player for Vince Gill and Conway Twitty, John Hughey, died Sunday night, Nov. 18 in Nashville at 73.

Hughey, a native of Elaine, Ark., got his first guitar - a Gene Autry model from Sears - when he was nine. In the seventh grade, he became friends with classmate Harold Jenkins, who would later adopt the name Conway Twitty.

Hughey persuaded his father to buy him a lap steel after hearing Little Roy Wiggins, Eddy Arnold's steel player. While still in high school, he and Jenkins formed the Phillips County Ramblers and briefly starred in their own radio show on a small local station.

In 1953, Hughey joined Slim Rhodes & The Mother's Best Mountaineers of Memphis. For the next several years, Hughey alternated between playing in Rhodes's band and performing in nightclubs.

In 1968, Hughey joined Twitty's band. Hughey toured and recorded with Twitty for the next 20 years. After that, he worked with Loretta Lynn for nearly 2 years before joining Gill's band, where he remained for 12 years.

He was inducted into the Steel Guitar Hall of Fame in 1996. In recent years, he was a member of the Time Jumpers, a band of studio and touring musicians that plays each Monday night at Nashville's Station Inn bluegrass club.

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Down to My Last Bad Habit CD review - Down to My Last Bad Habit
At this point in his career, Vince Gill could just as well have entitled this "Tried and True." He's not chasing trends - pop country or bro country - of chart-geared songs. He's too old for that, and at this point anyway, Gill knows what works for him. And there is quite a lot that works on his first solo album since 2011's "Guitar Slinger." (He did release the excellent "Bakersfield" with Paul Franklin in 2013). Gill prefers a more soulful approach, »»»
Guitar Slinger CD review - Guitar Slinger
It's hard to believe, considering what Vince Gill has accomplished over the past three decades, but the triple threat singer-songwriter-guitar picker may be in the most creative, productive stretch of his lengthy, remarkable career. Five years after Gill's Grammy-winning 4-album 43-song box set "These Days," his latest 12-song release again finds Gill tapping every ounce of his immense talents. The title song sums up his reputation as an ax man worthy of playing Eric »»»
These Days CD review - These Days
To put this release into perspective, it would take Axl Rose the better half of a century to issue the same amount of material. Fortunately, Vince Gill is about as prolific as they come these days, and this daring four-disc release only is further proof of that. Each disc is divvied up depending on his mood, with the opening "Working On A Big Chill" album being "The Rockin' Record." And this album sets things off right with the lovely mid-tempo and groovy title track. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile brings thoughtfulness – Brandi Carlile returned to the GRAMMY Museum for the third time, and it's easy to see why she's always invited back. The evening began with GRAMMY Executive Scott Goldman interviewing Carlile on a pair of stuffed chairs, which was followed directly by a brief set of live songs. The interview portion was informative, while Carlile's... »»»
Concert Review: LSD tour provides a lot of highs – This was not your grandkids' country, that's for sure. Even the name of the tour - the LSD Tour - was a throwback (albeit far before the principals were making music). But make no mistake about it. With the ever cool country traditionalist Dwight Yoakam, the country with some rock and blues and rabble rousing of Steve Earle thrown in and the... »»»
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