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LeAnn Rimes hosts Colgate Country Showdown

Thursday, November 15, 2007 – LeAnn Rimes will again host and perform at the 26th Annual Colgate Country Showdown National Final on Jan. 24, 2008 at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville. The Showdown is the Nation's largest and longest-running country music talent search and radio promotion.

Showdown producer Dean Unkefer said, "The most important thing is not winning or losing but having the opportunity to perform in front of live audiences and be exposed to industry professionals."

Each year, the competition begins in the spring with country radio stations producing live shows to find new talent in their market. About 50,000 people participate, according to the organizers.

The winners then compete at state and five regional competitions throughout the summer and fall. The five finalists compete for the grand prize of $100,000 at the National Final. The televised one-hour special is syndicated nationwide and last year also aired on the GAC (Great American Country) Network.

In addition to hosting the event, Rimes will perform two songs from her latest CD, "Family." Her first single, "Nothin' Better to Do," is currently climbing up the charts.

All participants are consistently judged on five core criteria: Marketability in country music, vocal/instrumental ability, originality of performance, stage presence/charisma and talent. Optional bonus points can be awarded to acts with original music in the songwriting category.

Past local, state and regional winners including Brad Paisley, Garth Brooks, Tim McGraw, Martina McBride, Billy Ray Cyrus, Sara Evans, Miranda Lambert and Carrie Underwood.

More news for LeAnn Rimes

CD reviews for LeAnn Rimes

One Christmas Chapter 1 CD review - One Christmas Chapter 1
LeAnn Rimes hasn't always been the most consistent album maker over the years, but there's no questioning the quality of her singing. Here gospel-y version of "Silent Night" on this Christmas EP, "One Christmas: Chapter," is truly a thing of beauty. Then when she sings a slow, soulful "Blue Christmas," which features that beautiful yodel in her voice, it should remind you of that wonderful Patsy Cline quality in her early recordings. »»»
Spitfire CD review - Spitfire
Say what you will about the vocal chops of today's leading ladies of country - Miranda Lambert, Faith Hill or Martina McBride chief among them - but LeAnn Rimes is hands down, no doubt about it the best female vocalist in country music today. And it will be bordering on a criminal act - thievery of the first order - if she doesn't sweep every award country music has to offer with her latest. For most of the bulk of the new millennium every Rimes album has been a treat. »»»
Lady and Gentlemen
Among female singers in country music, with the possible exception of Martina McBride, no one can touch LeAnn Rimes' voice for purity, grace, power and tone. Nowhere is Rimes' vocal prowess more evident than on her latest record, a 14-song collection of hits not by the women of country, but by a cross-section of all-star male country singers. Perhaps the best thing about this collection is that Rimes puts her own stamp on each song. That's easier said than done, since these are some »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Jayhawks remain in top form – It's usually a good time to catch a band right after they've released one of their better albums, and "Paging Mr. Proust" is one of The Jayhawks' best. Comprised of smart songs, which consistently put lead singer Gary Louris' engaging vibrato to proper use and instrumental textures that oftentimes stretch the Minnesota act... »»»
Concert Review: Alabama Shakes, Elvis celebrate music – Donald Trump was nowhere to be seen at the final day of the Newport Folk Festival, but that didn't mean he was ignored. Maybe it was the political roots of folk music. The Republican presidential candidate was mentioned at least three times - all by foreign musicians - during the finale. No one exactly endorsed his candidacy either.... »»»
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