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Big Machine starts new label, signs Jewel, Jimmy Wayne, Justin Moore

Friday, November 2, 2007 – Jewel is back with a new record deal, and it is with a new label, an off-shoot of Big Machine Records.

Big Machine head Scott Borchetta announced Friday that he was starting a new record imprint, Valory Music, with Jewel, Jimmy Wayne and new artist Justin Moore on the label.

Borchetta said he decided to form Valory because of the inability to release music quickly enough only on the Big Machine label. Big Machine is home to Trisha Yearwood, who is releasing her label debut later this month, Jack Ingram, Danielle Peck and Taylor Swift. Ingram, Peck and Swift all have enjoyed success with their first releases for Big Machine.

"Today is the evolution of our revolution," Borchetta said at a press conference.

"I was starting to get frustrated because we had more great artists ...than one label could handle. The realty is radio is still king in our business. I had to figure out another way to get more music out."

Borchetta said he hated to sit across the table from an artist and say "With a little luck, we can get the record out in 2009."

Jewel, who has had enjoyed much success in the pop realm, left Atlantic earlier this year after six albums. She said she was looking to make a country disc, but Atlantic was not receptive to going the country format. "I always to make a living as a songwriter," she said. "I just know about telling stories. I made a lot of my records here. I always had a creative energy here. I know I'm going to make a country record."

Wayne, a soulful country singer, had been on Big Machine, but had never released an album for the label. Althoug he previously had success on DreamWorks, Big Machine never broke a single he released.

Moore is a new artist from Arkansas.

Borchetta played snippets of one song from each artist. Each had a distinct country bent on the vocals and country instrumentation.

"What it all starts with and what it all ends with is the music," Borchetta said. "This music was just dying toget out."

Borchetta said he expected all three artists to have singles out in early 2008.

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