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Big Machine starts new label, signs Jewel, Jimmy Wayne, Justin Moore

Friday, November 2, 2007 – Jewel is back with a new record deal, and it is with a new label, an off-shoot of Big Machine Records.

Big Machine head Scott Borchetta announced Friday that he was starting a new record imprint, Valory Music, with Jewel, Jimmy Wayne and new artist Justin Moore on the label.

Borchetta said he decided to form Valory because of the inability to release music quickly enough only on the Big Machine label. Big Machine is home to Trisha Yearwood, who is releasing her label debut later this month, Jack Ingram, Danielle Peck and Taylor Swift. Ingram, Peck and Swift all have enjoyed success with their first releases for Big Machine.

"Today is the evolution of our revolution," Borchetta said at a press conference.

"I was starting to get frustrated because we had more great artists ...than one label could handle. The realty is radio is still king in our business. I had to figure out another way to get more music out."

Borchetta said he hated to sit across the table from an artist and say "With a little luck, we can get the record out in 2009."

Jewel, who has had enjoyed much success in the pop realm, left Atlantic earlier this year after six albums. She said she was looking to make a country disc, but Atlantic was not receptive to going the country format. "I always to make a living as a songwriter," she said. "I just know about telling stories. I made a lot of my records here. I always had a creative energy here. I know I'm going to make a country record."

Wayne, a soulful country singer, had been on Big Machine, but had never released an album for the label. Althoug he previously had success on DreamWorks, Big Machine never broke a single he released.

Moore is a new artist from Arkansas.

Borchetta played snippets of one song from each artist. Each had a distinct country bent on the vocals and country instrumentation.

"What it all starts with and what it all ends with is the music," Borchetta said. "This music was just dying toget out."

Borchetta said he expected all three artists to have singles out in early 2008.

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Do You Believe Me Now CD review - Do You Believe Me Now
Jimmy Wayne's turbulent childhood as a foster child and teen delinquent, and his personal journal writings, fueled many of the songs on his self-titled debut, painting him as a survivor and poet with a strapping, emotional voice and a penchant for vulnerable story songs. He brings more of these dramatic tales to his soulful sophomore effort (and first on the new label). In Kerosene Kid, Wayne reminisces about facing his classmates' jeers each winter, as he smelled of the kerosene he »»»
Jimmy Wayne
One wants desperately to like Jimmy Wayne - though he's just 30, he's already had enough trouble to last several lifetimes. But though "Stay Gone," the first single from his self-titled debut, has much to recommend it, it's one of the few bright spots in a generally undistinguished album. The basic problem isn't hard to see. Though he's a good songwriter with solid songwriting skills - 8 of the 12 cuts have his name among the credits - the production here surrounds him with generic country-pop »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: No joke, banjo man Pikelny excels – To most sound-minded individuals, the notion of a solo banjo concert is mildly daunting. Banjo jokes are second only to lawyer jokes in the American zeitgeist, so Noam Pikelny, a master banjo player doubtless knows what he is getting into when he presents his "One Man, One Banjo" tour. Pikelny's playing answers all questions.... »»»
Concert Review: Not playing the hit proves no problem for Bingham – Ryan Bingham may always end up being best known for collaborating with T Bone Burnett on the soundtrack for the 2009 film starring Jeff Bridges, particularly "The Weary Kind." That would not be a surprise given that he won a Grammy and Oscar for the song. One would, therefore, think that "The Weary Kind" would be one of those... »»»
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