Sign up for newsletter
 

Big Machine starts new label, signs Jewel, Jimmy Wayne, Justin Moore

Friday, November 2, 2007 – Jewel is back with a new record deal, and it is with a new label, an off-shoot of Big Machine Records.

Big Machine head Scott Borchetta announced Friday that he was starting a new record imprint, Valory Music, with Jewel, Jimmy Wayne and new artist Justin Moore on the label.

Borchetta said he decided to form Valory because of the inability to release music quickly enough only on the Big Machine label. Big Machine is home to Trisha Yearwood, who is releasing her label debut later this month, Jack Ingram, Danielle Peck and Taylor Swift. Ingram, Peck and Swift all have enjoyed success with their first releases for Big Machine.

"Today is the evolution of our revolution," Borchetta said at a press conference.

"I was starting to get frustrated because we had more great artists ...than one label could handle. The realty is radio is still king in our business. I had to figure out another way to get more music out."

Borchetta said he hated to sit across the table from an artist and say "With a little luck, we can get the record out in 2009."

Jewel, who has had enjoyed much success in the pop realm, left Atlantic earlier this year after six albums. She said she was looking to make a country disc, but Atlantic was not receptive to going the country format. "I always to make a living as a songwriter," she said. "I just know about telling stories. I made a lot of my records here. I always had a creative energy here. I know I'm going to make a country record."

Wayne, a soulful country singer, had been on Big Machine, but had never released an album for the label. Althoug he previously had success on DreamWorks, Big Machine never broke a single he released.

Moore is a new artist from Arkansas.

Borchetta played snippets of one song from each artist. Each had a distinct country bent on the vocals and country instrumentation.

"What it all starts with and what it all ends with is the music," Borchetta said. "This music was just dying toget out."

Borchetta said he expected all three artists to have singles out in early 2008.

More news for Jimmy Wayne

CD reviews for Jimmy Wayne

Sara Smile CD review - Sara Smile
Sometimes the third time out for an artist can mystify them, as by this point they've chosen to either clone or deconstruct their first record. So what's next? Jimmy Wayne, who sharply veered away from the deep emotional mining of his first effort to more straightforward country- pop on his second, goes the route of a hybrid collection. There's the big leadoff (and Keith Urban-penned) Things I Believe, which swings for the number one hit fences all the way with a hook heavy »»»
Do You Believe Me Now CD review - Do You Believe Me Now
Jimmy Wayne's turbulent childhood as a foster child and teen delinquent, and his personal journal writings, fueled many of the songs on his self-titled debut, painting him as a survivor and poet with a strapping, emotional voice and a penchant for vulnerable story songs. He brings more of these dramatic tales to his soulful sophomore effort (and first on the new label). In Kerosene Kid, Wayne reminisces about facing his classmates' jeers each winter, as he smelled of the kerosene he »»»
Jimmy Wayne
One wants desperately to like Jimmy Wayne - though he's just 30, he's already had enough trouble to last several lifetimes. But though "Stay Gone," the first single from his self-titled debut, has much to recommend it, it's one of the few bright spots in a generally undistinguished album. The basic problem isn't hard to see. Though he's a good songwriter with solid songwriting skills - 8 of the 12 cuts have his name among the credits - the production here surrounds him with generic country-pop »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lane oversees her queendom – When Nikki Lane rolled into town on her current Stagecoach Spotlight Tour, she and her touring mates were under the weather. Although illness didn't keep Lane performing (she was in fine voice throughout), Robert Ellis was a last-minute scratch. His replacement, Jenny O, was one high caliber fill-in, however, and kept the bill strong.... »»»
Concert Review: The Surly Gentlemen prove anything but – For about the past six months, veteran bluegrassers Clay Hess, formerly of Kentucky Thunder, and Tim Shelton of NewFound Road, along with Clay's son Brennan, have collectively been The Surly Gentlemen. The trio's sound is probably best described as stripped down bluegrass meets singer/songwriter. These Surly Gents have been playing small... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Gibson Brothers rise up from "In the Ground" There's no more solid live bluegrass show than the Gibson Brothers. They play with great technical skill and crispness. Their harmonies are just what a brother act should be: sweet, true and never forced. Brothers Leigh and Eric Gibson surround themselves with outstanding sidemen with impeccable bluegrass cred: Jesse Brock (mandolin), Mike Barber (bass) and Clayton Campbell on fiddle.... »»»
The Devil Makes Three examine salvation, sin For nearly a decade and a half, The Devil Makes Three has concocted an amazing blend of bluegrass, folk, country, blues, rockabilly and whatever happens to bubble to the surface, and applied it liberally to their songwriting ethic.... »»»
For Shires, home is where the family lies Mercy Rose Isbell recently celebrated her first birthday and, ironically, the album she helped inspire has just been released. Synchronicity is a beautiful thing. Mercy Rose is, of course, the daughter of singer/songwriters Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires, two of the most gifted Americana artists working today... ... »»»
The Drugstore Gypsies CD review - The Drugstore Gypsies
In a time when good old fashioned electric guitar rock has grown a bit stagnant, a fresh new quintet from Texas is stepping up to provide a jolt courtesy of a concise and confident debut that makes a case for the genre by adding touches of blues, country and southern rock to muscular classic rock riffs. »»»
Universal Favorite CD review - Universal Favorite
Noam Pikelny is the most ingratiating musical iconoclast you're likely to come across. He has deep roots in the Americana genre, and his playing, on banjo in most contexts, is precise and brilliant. Pikelny has produced a string of outstanding solo records, most recently "Universal Favorite."  »»»
Vaquero CD review - Vaquero
Independent singer/songwriter Aaron Watson's "Vaquero" is an ambitious 16-song mix of Texas country and mainstream Nashville with mostly good results. The strongest tracks are those that embrace the Tex Mex style of the title track, which imparts some sound advice delivered by an "old Mexican cowboy" the singer meets in a bar ("don't live your life like a sad country song/ A fool on a stool still a fool right or wrong"). »»»
Graveyard Whistle CD review - Graveyard Whistle
Old 97s' "Graveyard Whistling" is a slight return to form after 2014's "Most Messed Up," which was heavy on profanity, but far too light on charming country songs. "Graveyard Whistling" is a little more innocent and a lot more fun than its predecessor. "Bad Luck Charm," for instance, finds lead vocalist Rhett Miller playing a familiar role - that of lovable loser.  »»»
Freedom Highay CD review - Freedom Highay
Rhiannon Gidden's "Freedom Highway" takes an expansive look at the Black experience in America. "Better Get It Right the First Time" utilizes a gospel-y call and response format to tell the tragic story of a Black life that mattered. However, Giddens goes all the way back to slavery days for the lyrics to "At the Purchaser's Option." »»»
Notes of Blue CD review - Notes of Blue
Son Volt's "Notes of Blue" is said to be influenced by the blues (among other musical styles), and the blues is most at the fore during "Cherokee St.," a stomping, electric guitar-driven blues rocker. The song has the stripped-down sound of a Blind Willie Johnson sermon, although lead vocalist Jay Farrar is by no means the gravelly singer Johnson was. »»»