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CMA honors writers

Wednesday, February 20, 2019 – The Country Music Association honored the songwriters behind the hits at the 10th annual CMA Triple Play Awards on Tuesday.

CMA Triple Play Awards recipients were honored for having penned three number one songs within a 12-month period based on the Country Aircheck, Billboard Country Airplay and Billboard Hot Country Songs charts.

Luke Combs, Jesse Frasure, Nicolle Galyon, Ashley Gorley, Tyler Hubbard, Josh Kear, Shane McAnally, Chase McGill, Josh Osborne and Thomas Rhett received trophies.

Combs accepted his first CMA Triple Play Award joking, "I'm Luke, by the way, if you guys didn't know. I probably look like the guy who changes your oil, but I'm not." He continued to thank his team, explaining, "This is truly an award that is not for me, it's for the publishers, the promo teams, the fans in country radio, the people that buy tickets to my concerts."

Galyon, who was also honored with her first CMA Triple Play Award, said, "A number of people have liked to point out I'm the only woman up here, but I was thinking today about how the really cool story about that is I've written with all of the men that are winning this award today, I've never been treated with anything but encouragement, like a sister. I've been empowered. I've been so respected by all of my brothers in this business. I think that's a story that we don't hear enough. I'm just really proud to be a part of this community and the way that we all encourage and cheer for each other. Brothers and sisters alike."

Kear said, "This is stunning, always. Amazing. It's hard to believe they ever line up properly. I've made my entire career out of writing fiction, but not these three songs."

"This award is the miracle," Frasure said. "It doesn't really matter how hard you work, it just takes so much to line up for this to happen. So, this one is like the Super Bowl for us." Before finishing he thanked Thomas Rhett. "Thomas, thank you man. All three of these are you, so literally I would not be here if it wasn't for you. I love you man, I love your family."

Rhett later took the stage to thank his family for inspiration saying, "I got to write 'Life Changes' with my dad, which was probably the coolest thing in the world to get to write a song about my life and then my dad to put perspective into watching me grow up."

Those honored were:

Luke Combs
"Hurricane"
"When It Rains It Pours"
"One Number Away"

Jesse Frasure
"Unforgettable," recorded by Thomas Rhett "
Marry Me," recorded by Thomas Rhett
"Life Changes," recorded by Thomas Rhett

Nicolle Galyon
"All the Pretty Girls," recorded by Kenny Chesney
"Tequila," recorded by Dan + Shay
"Coming Home," recorded by Keith Urban ft. Julia Michaels

Ashley Gorley
"Fix A Drink," recorded by Chris Janson
"Marry Me," recorded by Thomas Rhett
"Life Changes," recorded by Thomas Rhett

Tyler Hubbard
"Meant to Be," recorded by Bebe Rexha ft. Florida Georgia Line
"You Make It Easy," recorded by Jason Aldean
"Simple," recorded by Florida Georgia Line

Josh Kear
"God, Your Mama, And Me," recorded by Florida Georgia Line ft. Backstreet Boys
"Most People Are Good," recorded by Luke Bryan
"Woman, Amen," recorded by Dierks Bentley

Shane McAnally
"Written in the Sand," recorded by Old Dominion
"Marry Me," recorded by Thomas Rhett
"Get Along," recorded by Kenny Chesney

Chase McGill
"Sunrise, Sunburn, Sunset," recorded by Luke Bryan
"Break Up in the End," recorded by Cole Swindell
"Lose It," recorded by Kane Brown

Josh Osborne
"Drinkin' Problem," recorded by Midland
"All the Pretty Girls," recorded by Kenny Chesney
"Get Along," recorded by Kenny Chesney

Thomas Rhett
"Unforgettable"
"Marry Me"
"Life Changes"

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