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Country community extends condolences on Clark's passing

Thursday, November 15, 2018 – The country community paid its respect to Roy Clark, who passed away today at 85.

The response ranged from people who grew up learning from his guitar book to those who knew him for six decades.

"Roy Clark was one of the greatest ever. His spirit will never die. I loved him dearly, and he will be missed," said Dolly Parton.

Brad Paisley not only learned from him, but benefited from his generosity. "My story is not unique. How many guitar players started with a Roy Clark guitar method book? How many guitars were sold to people wanting to play because of him? How many lives were made better because of his wit and joy? I'm one of so many," Paisley said.

"When the Nashville floods wiped out most of my guitars, Roy heard about it and showed up at a show and gave me one of his. This is who this man was. Constantly giving. I owe him so much. Go say hi to my Papaw for me Roy. You left the world a much better place," he said.

"Roy Clark shaped my path. My papaw introduced me to his music as a toddler. Every Saturday, we'd watch Hee Haw. My first guitar book was a Roy Clark guitar method. I practiced his style, then practiced making his facial expressions. He was a hero. And so many have the same story."

The Country Music Hall of Fame, of which Clark was a member, also sent condolences. ""Our community and fans around the world have lost a strong ambassador for country music," said CMA CEO Sarah Trahern. "Roy was one of those instantly recognizable artists. I was blessed to get to work with him on many occasions, and I will forever smile thinking of him Pickin' and Grinnin'."

Moe Bandy said, "He was one of my best friends. One of the most talented people I have ever met. He was a true gentleman who was nice to his fans and friends. One-of-a-kind. We'll truly miss him."

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