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Rockabilly filly Lorrie Collins dies

Wednesday, August 8, 2018 – Lorrie Collins, who was one-half of the rockabilly duo The Collins Kids, died on Saturday at 76.

The Collins Kids were an American rockabilly duo comprised of Lorrie Collins and her younger brother, Larry. He said that she died due to complications from a fall, according to the New York Times.

Hits included "Hop, Skip and Jump," "Beetle Bug Bop" and "Hoy Hoy," which they recorded as youngsters.

Lorrie Collins was born May 7, 1942 in Creek County, Okla. They moved to California after their parents received advice from former Texas Playboy Leon McAuliffe that they should move there to advance the music careers of their children.

The Collins Kids were regular performers on Town Hall Party in 1954 in California. They also were on the syndicated for television version of the show, Tex Ritter's Ranch Party, from 1957 to 1959.

As a teenager, she was the girlfriend of TV star and teen idol Ricky Nelson on the TV show "The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet and in private life.

The duo recorded for Columbia Records, but never charted on the Billboard country charts. They toured with the likes of Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins.

In 1959, she married Stu Carnall, who was Johnny Cash's manager and twice her age. Collins acted and sang with Nelson and recorded and toured with her brother until she gave birth to her first child in 1961. Collins quit performing to be with her family. Collins and Carnall eventually divorced.

Larry Collins helped write a few hits, including "Delta Dawn" and ".You're the Reason God Made Oklahoma." He also recorded his own material in Muscle Shoals, Ala.

The duo reunited for a rockabilly revival concert in Hemsby-on-Thames, England in 1993 before 3,000 fans. The Collins Kids returned to the U.S., playing sold-out dates at both San Francisco's Bimbo's and Hollywood's Palamino nightclubs. They continued playing until Lorrie passed away.

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