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Final Owens Capitol recording finally sees light of day - four decades later

Thursday, June 14, 2018 – More than four decades after it was recorded, Buck Owens' final CD will see the light of day this summer.

Omnivore Recordings, in conjunction with Owens' estate, will release "Country Singer's Prayer," his final Capitol album from 1975. The release date is Aug. 17.

By late 1975, Owens' success at Capitol Records was winding down. His singles were no longer topping the charts, and after the untimely death of band mate Don Rich the year before.

His contract with Capitol was due to expire at the end of the year, and he and the Buckaroos readied one final album for the label in November 1975.

His last single for the label, "Country Singer's Prayer," failed to chart. The label shelved the final album. Capitol did release "Best of Buck Owens, Vol. 6," which did include the last two singles originally intended for "Country Singer's Prayer," "Battle of New Orleans" and the title track.

Owens revisited some of these songs with producer Norro Wilson in Nashville after signing to Warner Bros. Records, the original recordings produced at Owens' Bakersfield studio with the Buckaroos remained in the vault.

The release was taken from the original LP master tapes, in what was the intended sequence. Also included are the B-sides to Buck's final two singles from the unissued album.

The release contains new liner notes by Scott B. Bomar featuring interviews with longtime Buckaroos piano player Jim Shaw and Robert John Jones (a.k.a. Rocky Topp.

The track listing is:
1. John Law
2. Love Don't Make The Bars
3. He Ain't Been Out Bowling With The Boys
4. Drifting Away
5. The Battle Of New Orleans
6. Country Singer's Prayer
7. California Okie
8. A Different Kind Of Sad
9. It's Been A Long, Long Time
10. How's Everything

Bonus Tracks:
11. Run Him To The Round House Nellie (You Might Corner Him There)
12. Meanwhile Back At The Ranch

More news for Buck Owens

CD reviews for Buck Owens

Country Singer's Prayer CD review - Country Singer's Prayer
When the hits stop coming, country labels move on; loyalty is fleeting, never mind 19 number 1 hits (14 consecutive), more than 40 Top 10 songs, and 15 years with a label. Buck Owens found that out in the mid-'70s as his contract with Capitol was coming to an end, and the label shelved his final album of new material. Unheard since that time except through the expansive Bear Family box-set "Tall Dark Stranger," these recordings hold interest for those who appreciate encountering »»»
Live from Austin, TX
It was hard to find a more significant country artist through the 1960s than Buck Owens. With 21 number ones from 1963 ("Act Naturally," included here) and 1972, including a stretch of 14 in a row, Buck Owens was one of country music's biggest stars, bringing his slant on the Bakersfield Sound to stages, radio and television around the world. In this 1988 Austin City Limits program and nearing 60 years old, Owens appears comfortable with his stature as a torchbearer. »»»
Bound for Bakersfield: 1953-1956 The Complete Pre-Capitol Collection CD review - Bound for Bakersfield: 1953-1956 The Complete Pre-Capitol Collection
Buck Owens had not yet developed the style that would make him a superstar in the '60s when he recorded the songs in this collection for small California labels Pep, Chesterfield and La Brea Records between 1953 and 1956. The Hank Williams influence is heard in the balladBlue Love, Owens' first known recording, as well as early Owens compositions Right After The Dance, Down On The Corner Of Love and It Don't Show On Me. Other impressive Owens compositions are the George Jones »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: There's a lot to be said about The Felice Brothers – The Felice Brothers have soldiered on, occupying the fringes of the musical world with ups and downs. After not knowing whether the group would even continue following the departure of half of the band a few years ago, The Felice Brothers continued with a new rhythm section and a new album, "Undressed," that is heavily political.... »»»
Concert Review: Turner bring it on (to his second) home – Frank Turner opined during the first of four sold-out nights of the Lost Evenings Festival that Boston was his home away from his British home. The likable, accessible singer hit the sweet spot not only with his perspective, but his performance as well demonstrated why. Turner made a major change in this year's festival. For the first time, he... »»»
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