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For The Devil Makes Three, "Chains Are Broken"

Monday, June 4, 2018 – The Devil Makes Three are set to return with "Chains Are Broken" on Aug. 24 via New West Records.

The 11-song set was produced by Ted Hutt (Gaslight Anthem, Flogging Molly) and recorded at Sonic Ranch Studios in El Paso, Texas. This is the trio's first album of original material since 2013's "I'm A Stranger Here." The Devil Makes Three released a 2016 collection of covers, "Redemption & Ruin."

The band mixes country, blues, rock and folk.

Instead of their traditional revolving cast of collaborators in the studio, The Devil Makes Three stuck to its members - Pete Bernhard, Lucia Turino and Cooper McBean - with one addition. Touring drummer Stefan Amidon helped out.

The song "Paint My Face" was released online today on Rolling Stone Country. "'Paint My Face' reflects the extra rock and roll edge that Amidon, the band's touring drummer, brings to the equation, as the song is a crunchy shuffle with a quivering, cascading electric guitar line."

"Despite its somewhat sinister tone, 'Paint My Face' is as much a song about rebirth, both spiritual and creative, as it is about death," the band said in a statement.

The track list is:
1. Chains Are Broken
2. Pray For Rain
3. Paint My Face
4. Can't Stop
5. Need To Lose
6. All Is Quiet
7. Bad Idea
8. Deep Down
9. Native Son
10. Castles
11. Curtains Rise

"I always want our songs to unfold like short stories," said Bernhard. "You could think of them as chapters of a book. This was a much more personal album about what it takes to be a writer of any kind - and what you have to do to make your dream possible. It was really the headspace I was in. It might have something to do with getting older. You start reflecting on life and the people around you. I was doing that in these songs. That's what makes the record more personal. I'm pulling from these things. Some of it is about drug addiction. Some of it is about the things you sacrifice. Some of it is about the detrimental things we do for inspiration. Nevertheless, they all have some sort of narrative."

More news for The Devil Makes Three

CD reviews for The Devil Makes Three

Chains Are Broken
It's hard to see where The Devil Makes Three fits into Americana/Roots music. To be sure, Pete Bernhard, Lucia Turino and Cooper McBean have an estimable body of work, well represented on "Chains Are Broken." But the field of mid-level singer-composer groups is crowded. There's always room for standout material and musicianship, and The Devil Makes Three continues to bid for broader appeal. "Chains Are Broken" gets better with repeated listens. »»»
Redemption & Ruin CD review - Redemption & Ruin
Charles Baudelaire and Verbal Kint separately and astutely noted that the devil's greatest trick is in convincing the world that he doesn't exist. There could be a corollary concerning the reality of The Devil Makes Three; the trio exists in so many different musical forms that they may well have talked us into believing they're a dozen distinct bands when they are in fact just one single, extraordinarily talented unit. Over the past 14 years, The Devil Makes Three has released »»»
I'm a Stranger Here CD review - I'm a Stranger Here
Pulling off Depression-era roots music isn't necessarily anything new, but making an album of it compelling without sounding corny, clichéd or simply boring isn't easy. Give The Devil Makes Three a ton of credit for doing it with both feet in the past - yet firmly cemented in the present. The album art complete with old appliances including a $15.90-cent record player sets the tone, and the 10 songs within are gems no matter what the era. Guided by Buddy Miller's wizened »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: There's a lot to be said about The Felice Brothers – The Felice Brothers have soldiered on, occupying the fringes of the musical world with ups and downs. After not knowing whether the group would even continue following the departure of half of the band a few years ago, The Felice Brothers continued with a new rhythm section and a new album, "Undressed," that is heavily political.... »»»
Concert Review: Turner bring it on (to his second) home – Frank Turner opined during the first of four sold-out nights of the Lost Evenings Festival that Boston was his home away from his British home. The likable, accessible singer hit the sweet spot not only with his perspective, but his performance as well demonstrated why. Turner made a major change in this year's festival. For the first time, he... »»»
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